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Archive for the ‘Aluminum’ Category

It’s not only ethylene tree based synthetics that destroy the brain but also heavy metals. All metals hijack the way the body processes calcium in our biological machines.

PBS Nova’s Poisoned Water explains…

“NARRATOR: Dr. Kim Cecil is an investigator for the Cincinnati Lead Study.

DR. KIM CECIL: So, lead tricks the body into thinking it’s calcium. Whenever lead has got into your body, primarily through ingestion, it goes and hides where calcium should be, in the bones and in the cells of the brain.

Visualize a neuron. There’s the neuron that’s sending the signal and then another that’s receiving the signal, and, typically, calcium is in that gap.

NARRATOR: Calcium is essential for neurons to communicate, but when a child is exposed to lead, lead gets in that gap and blocks the flow of calcium. Without calcium, synapses get weaker and brain function suffers.
Understanding how we evolved with calcium helps you understand how destructive heavy metals are to our biological machines. Microcosmos: Four Billion Years of Microbial Evolution by Lynn Margulis and Dorian Sagan provides much understanding.

“Crucial to their transfer onto land was what animals did with the element calcium. Calcium is a raw material in the making of many of the most magnificent biological structures, such as the human skull or the White Cliffs of Dover. The amount of calcium in solution in the cytoplasm of a nucleated cell must always be kept around one part in ten million. Yet calcium in seawater can be 10,000 times or more higher than this. Calcium tends to rush into cells, causing them to be continually ridding themselves of it. As all cells with nuclei do now, the first animal cells had to continuously export calcium outside their cells in order to stay healthy. Today, calcium carbonate is made by special cells inside membraneous sacs. The chalky substance is transferred in precrystaline form via channels–along which run the ubiquitous microtubules–to the outside of the cell.

Calcium plays a central part in the metabolism of all nucleated cells. It plays an indispensable role in amoeboid cell movement, cell secretion, microtubule formation, and cell adhesion. Dissolved calcium must be continually removed from the surrounding solution for microtubules to function in mitosis, meiotic sex, and brain activity. Because the “chemo-” part of chemoelectric messages sent by the nerve cells in the brain has largely to do with calcium, the neuron-firing communication networks of the brain depend as much on calcium as telephone communication does on copper telephone wire. By 620 million years ago the first tiny animal brains had evolved.

Perhaps more important for these early animals was the use of calcium in the operation of muscles. Muscles contract when dissolved calcium and ATP are released in precise quantities around them. The calcium must be scrupulously kept in quantities far lower than those of seawater or chemistry takes over and the calcium phosphate comes out of the solution in a solid form. (This is why athletes overworking their muscles tend to develop calcium deposits.) Muscle tissue, and the actinomyosin proteins comprising it, tends to be the same in all animals. The origin of actin is an evolutionary mystery; an actinlike protein has been reported in the putative ancestor to our cells, Thermoplasma. If confirmed we have still another case of an invention that originated in the bacterial microcosm.

The soft bodied underwater worms and blobs of Ediacaran times swam using muscles. To do so they controlled their calcium metabolism. Since muscle contraction responds to calcium release, it is extremely probable that the early Cambrian sea creatures, even the earliest squiggling annelid worms, must surely have had muscles under calcium control. Like Greek and Roman breastplates and helmets, some of these early animals must have secreted bits and pieces of calcareous armor and protective films that were not yet full skeletons.

It is rather remarkable that in otherwise very closely related species, one will calcify while the other will not. For instance, the only difference between certain closely related species of coralline red algae is that one is covered by stony calcium carbonate plates while the other is totally soft. Stephen Weiner of the Weizmann Research Institute in Israel believes that the calcifying species makes enough of the proteins having a regular spacing to fit the calcium carbonate crystals in the proteins’ framework. The other species, however, makes too little or an altered form of the protein with inappropriate spacing. On the other hand, since in some cases separate species of organisms which branched apart millions of years ago will both produce calcium carbonate today, it is probable that the ability to precipitate calcium compounds in a regular manner has successfully evolved many times in many different species for many distinct purposes.

Always used by nucleated cells, excess calcium must be excreted or harmlessly stockpiled out of solution. Since Cambrian times organisms have been stockpiling their reserves as calcium phosphate, which takes such forms as teeth and bones, or as calcium carbonate, as in chalky shells.

Skeletons did not appear out of nowhere during the Cambrian: Ediacaran muscles preceded Cambrian skeletons. The need to continuously respond to calcium surpluses in the cell made it easy for some animals to stockpile calcium salts inside or outside their bodies in dump heaps that eventually became skeletons and body armor. Just as termite nests are largely constructed of insect excrement and saliva, so skeletons and teeth are made of compounds that originally had to be excreted as waste.

Most animal shells and outer coats today are composed of calcium carbonate. Tiny ocean protists such as foraminifera and coccolithophorids extruded so much calcium into the water over such long periods of time that they made the famous piece of English real estate, the White Cliffs of Dover, a towering deposit of limestone and chalk. (Like coal or oil, such organic carbon reserves are not wasted but held in biospheric storage until life discovers new ways of recycling them.)

The new organs that supplanted the old, waterlogged ones were forced to be successful. Gills, expert at culling oxygen from water, were useless in the air. Over the millennia they became relics, like the gill slits that look like tiny scars under the ears of human fetuses. Lungs which could deliver air to the circulatory system evolved in some chordates, such as the amphibians, reptiles, and mammals. An analogous system of air channels called trachea evolved in land-adapted arthropods such as spiders and insects.

When facing frightening environmental perils, organisms warded off the need for radical change by incorporating the new into the tried-an-true old. The assembly of bones that had evolved in swimming fish served later to support amphibians on land, and to aerodynamically support birds in the air. Calcium waste near muscles became basic construction materials. Early vertebrates evolved into fish–bilaterally symmetrical beings that were essentially escape artists and speedsters, darting away from predators and rapidly pursuing their prey.

Competition among vicious predators along with desiccation in shallow waters forced early animals to live on land. But the scorching earth was no happy alternative to the warring seas. The land was in some ways an Edenic paradise, a sanctuary originally free of dangerous predators. But it was also a separate hell–an environment of torturous sun, biting wind, and decreased buoyancy. Calcified structures such as snail shells began as dumps for excess calcium but wound up as a combination of gravitational support structures, shields against sunlight and predators, and organic “aquariums” protecting against the dangers of desiccation.”

Pages 184 – 187

Lead, Fluoride, Cadmium, Aluminum, Cobalt and more are all metals that destroy our biological machines. The Bleeding Edge documentary examined the dementia symptoms of those who received cobalt hip replacements. Understand that there’s little thought being applied to consumer health when they profit from selling you the products that destroy your health and they also profit from treating you.
“I was unaware that my particular implant, like most hip implants available in the United States, had only a cursory pre-market review by the FDA… Dr. Tower and DBEC were the first to recognize that excessive wear of metal-on-metal hips (a chrome-cobalt ball rubbing on a chrome-cobalt socket) could not only result in failure of the replacement because of damage to the tissues about the hip, but they also might result in cobalt poisoning (cobaltism).”
Heavy metals and synthetic chemical manufacturing are also why mot synthetics are contaminated with heavy metals. It’s why PVC frequently contains high levels of lead. That has not stopped manufacturers from manufacturing and selling infant baby products made with PVC.

 

 

Green Chemistry: Theory & Practice explains the use of heavy metals in synthetic chemical manufacturing.

3.1 Alternative feedstocks/starting materials

Currently, 98% of all organic chemicals synthesized in the United Sates are made from petroleum feedstocks. Petroleum refining takes up 15% of the total energy used in the US, and its energy usage is rising because the low quality raw petroleum available now requires more energy for refinement. During conversion to useful organic chemicals, petroleum undergoes oxidation, the addition of oxygen or an equivalent; this oxidation step has historically been one of the most environmentally polluting steps in chemical synthesis. As a result of these consideration, it is important to reduce our use of petroleum-based products by using alternative feedstocks….

The exploration of biological sources of alternative feedstocks need not be limited to agricultural products: agricultural waste or biomass, and non-food-related bioproducts, which are often made up of a variety of lignocellulosic materials, may provide important alternative feedstocks.

Other classes of alternative feedstocks are also emerging, such as light. For example, heavy metals, which are often used in petroleum oxidation processes, are also quite toxic and are carcinogens or cause damage to neurological systems. Recently discovered alternative syntheses replace the heavy metal reagents with the use of visible light to carry out the required chemical transformations.”

Chasing Molecules – The Polycarbonate Problem. BPA, Benzene, Phenols, & Carbonyl Chloride (also known as Phosgene)Chasing Molecules by Elizabeth Grossman
An excerpt from the chapter, “The Polycarbonate Problem.”BPA, Benzene, Phenols, & Carbonyl Chloride (also known as Phosgene)

“Phenols are commonly made by oxidizing benzene, which essentially means adding oxygen to benzene.”

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