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This is Dr. Mary Sherman. Please remember her face because she tried to save your children’s lives by blowing a critically important whistle. She was brutally murdered for trying to warn you all. And the men she warned were destroyed as well.

Book excerpt from Mary Ferrie and the Monkey Virus: The Story of an Underground Medical Laboratory.

Chapter 3: The Classroom

“In one of my classes there was a student named Nicky. His father was Dr. Nicolas Chetta, the Coronor of Orleans Parish who was involved with Garrison’s investigation. Dr. Chetta was somewhat of a local celebrity for us. Not only was he an elected politician whose name was frequently in the press, but he was the team physician for our football team. Once he even took our class to on a memorable field trip to the city morgue….

Nicky erupted and said in a loud, tense voice that Garrison had gotten a “raw deal.”….

Then Nicky started talking. He held the class spellbound for fifteen minutes with information about the investigation, much of which had either not been revealed to the press or which they had basically ignored. We all listened carefully. His points included:

– that someone, presumably the FBI or the CIA, had bugged Garisson’s office and conference rooms and had stolen and/or photocopied his files concerning Clay Shaw and had turned them over to Shaw’s attorneys.

– that ALL of Garisson’s extradition requests for witnesses from other states had been turned down, as had all of his requests to subpoena former federal officials, preventing him from assembling the pieces of his puzzle in a court of law.

– that an ex-pilot named David Ferrie and a former high-ranking official named Guy Banister had been training anti-Castro Cubans for paramilitary assaults against Cuba at a secret training camp across Lake Pontchartrain, and

– that Ferrie and Banister had stolen weapons for this operation from a company in Houma, Louisiana which was operating as a CIA front. Nicky said he couldn’t pronounce the name of the company, but said that the name “looked German, but sounded French.” (He was referring to the Schlumberger Tool Company, pronounced Slum-ber-jay.”)

Someone asked Nicky why we had not heard all this in the press. It was a fair question. We had been taught that the press was the “Watchdog of Government.” How could they have overlooked these obvious and important points. Nicky paused and said Garisson’s favorite saying was “Treason never prospers, for if it prospers, none dare call it treason….

Ferrie was an unusual man in many respects. Professionally, he was a pilot. Politically, he was a notorious right wing extremist. Personally, he was completely bald from head-to-toe and was a homosexual who favored teenage boys… Ferrie died several days after Garrison’s investigation was made public. Garrison, who was about to arrest Ferrie for conspiring to murder President Kennedy, thought that either Ferrie had been murdered to silence him or that Ferrie had silenced himself. But it was the Coroner’s job, not the District Attorney’s, to rule on the cause of death. Dr. Chetta, Nicky’s father, was the Coroner and said he found no evidence of foul play. Therefore, he ruled that Ferrie died of natural causes (a ruptured blood vessel in the brain) and noted that Ferrie had been under enormous stress.

Nicky continued: Ferrie had known Lee Harvey Oswald when he was a cadet at the Civil Air Patrol and had been with him that summer…

Nicky said the day they announced Ferrie’s death, Bobby Kennedy called his father to discuss the cause of death with his father. A murmur shot through the room. Nicky countered by saying that he had answered the phone himself. Thinking it was a prank, he hung up on the Senator, But Kennedy called back. This time Nicky’s father answered the phone himself.

Then Nicky started talking about Ferrie’s apartment which his father had seen the day Ferrie died. Ferrie lived alone. But in his closets they had found both women’s clothing and priest’s robes. They also found a small laboratory with a dozen mice in cages which he used for medical experiments. His medical equipment included microscopes, syringes, surgical tools, and a medical library. When he talked to Ferrie’s other landlords, they were told of a full scale laboratory in his apartment with thousands of mice in cages. He was inducing cancer! Ferrie claimed he was looking for a cure for cancer, but Garrison’s investigators thought he was trying to figure out a way to use cancer as an assassination weapon, presumably against Castro and his followers.

A student asked, “How could they induce cancer?”….

MONKEY VIRUSES! The room groaned. I rolled my eyes and dropped my forehead into my hand. Why did it have to be monkey viruses? Garrison was already misunderstood because his plot was stranger than jazz – too complex, too subtle, and too bizarre for the American TV audience. Why couldn’t it have been something simpler, like injecting rats with radiation. Cancer from plutonium? The public might follow that, but cancer from monkey viruses! The rest of the country would never buy it. The very words conjured up a dark college of alienating images – diseases imported from tropical jungles in the bellies of insects mixed with monkey heads boiled in voodoo rituals on the edge of the Louisiana swamp at midnight. It was all “so New Orleans.”

You could feel that everyone in the room wanted to believe Nicky, but it was hard to know what to say. Then somebody said, “I don’t get it. How could a monkey virus cause cancer?” Nicky said he didn’t understand that part either. My brain was about to burst, but I wasn’t about to bring Tulane into the conversation. Then another student blurted out that there was a “kid” down at Tulane Medical School who was dying from the total collapse of his immune system. They couldn’t figure out what was causing it. They gave him every antibiotic they had and nothing worked. He would get better for a while, and then he would get worse. While this comment was interesting, it sounded “off the wall.” Two thoughts raced through my head. First, what did the uncontrollable collapse of an immune system have to do with our discussion about monkey viruses? And secondly, I said to myself: I’m obviously not the only student at Jesuit that has a family member working at Tulane Medical School. I was certain that this was “insider” information. It was the first time I had ever heard it (But not the last!)…..

“But Mom,” I said in an exasperated and serious tone, “weren’t they researching monkey viruses down at Tulane Medical School? Don’t you think there could be a connection?”

“Well,” she said, “one of the doctors from Tulane was involved in that lab.”

Now, I was stunned. “Wait a second,” I countered and tried to get my bearings. “Are you telling me a professor from Tulane Medical School was involved in David Ferrie’s underground medical laboratory? The one with thousands of mice?”

“Oh, yes,” she said matter-of-factly. “Everybody down at the medical school was talking about it. It was in that Playboy interview with Garrison that you had around here a couple years ago. I took it to Boston with me that Christmas to see your sister.”

“Who was the doctor?” I muttered. I could barely get the question out.

“Her name was Mary Sherman. Daddy knew her. He had a lot of respect for her. I think she was a pathologist. You know, she was more of a researcher than a physician. A cancer researcher, I think.”

“What happened to her?” I asked, resigning myself to the fact that some terrible fate must have befallen her.

“She was killed. Murdered. A terrible thing. Slashed with a knife, dismembered, and set on fire. It looked like a sexual killing, you know. But the grapevine said that whoever killed her knew what they were doing with a knife… maybe even had a high level of medical knowledge, just judging by the way the cuts were done. What a terrible way to go!”

“Did they figure out who did it?” I queried hopefully.

“No. The investigation was shut down all of a sudden. It was all hush-hush, like it had been shut down from above. But they think she knew her murderer and probably let them into her apartment.”

“You said Daddy knew her?”

“Oh, yes. They worked together for years. She was older and considerably higher up the ladder than he was, but Daddy always said that she was one of the top people in her field. He had a lot of respect for her. Professional respect, I mean.”

“Did you ever meet her?”

“Yes, we had dinner at her apartment one night. A strange woman, but very sophisticated and very well traveled. And very into theatre and literature, I felt very out of place. All I could talk about was my children..”
“On July 23, 1964, however, the day after Mary Sherman’s murder, Oschner wrote a letter to his largest financial contributor saying “our government, our schools, our press, and our churches have become infiltrated with Communism.” – Page 185.

(It appears the communists must have forgotten to infiltrate “our hospitals” and we all know what the Nazis and the CIA did to “Communists” who attempted to destroy their for-profit hydrocarbon/munition model that profits from the sick and injured.)

“All of Mary Sherman’s scientific and medical books, treatises and equipment “of every kind, nature, and description” whether in her apartment, office or laboratory were given to the Alton Oschner Medical Foundation. The receipt for this bequest was signed by Dr. Alton Oschner himself.”… (on June 15, 1965.)

Chapter 13: What’s Wrong With This Picture?

… What of this fire? What was the temperature inside her apartment? And just how badly burned was Mary Sherman’s body?

The newspapers were of no help on this question. Other than generally describing her body as “charred,” all the press ever said about the damage to Dr. Sherman’s body was one quote which appeared on the last day of the 1964 press coverage. It read:

The fire smoldered for some time – long enough to denude an innerspring and burn away the flesh from one of the doctor’s arms.

It is interesting to consider that this was the only detail the public heard about the actual damage done to the victim’s body until the police reports were released nearly thirty years later.

The Precinct Report said:

From further examination of the body, it was noted by the coroner that the right arm and a portion of the right side of the body extending from the right hip to the right shoulder was completely burned away exposing various vital organs.

The cause of death was…. 5. Extreme burns of right side of body with complete destruction of right upper extremity and right side of thorax (chest) and abdomen.

The Homicide Report summarized these same autopsy findings and added:

The right side of the body from the waist to where the right shoulder should be, including the whole right arm, was apparently disintegrated from the fire, yielding the inside organs of the body.

Further, it describes the clothes which were piled on top of her body, some of which had never even burned.

The body was nude; however, there was clothing which had apparently been placed on top of her body, mostly covering the body from just above the pubic area to the neck. Some of the mentioned clothes had been burned completely, while others were still intact, but scorched.

According to the Criminologist, the mentioned clothes were composed of synthetic material which would have to reach a temperature of about 500 F before it would ignite into a flame; however, prior to this, there would be a smoldering effect.

Just to be clear, let me state what I think this saying. If the temperature in the bedroom reached 500 degrees Fahrenheit (260 degrees C) the clothes piled on top of Mary would have ignited and burned. Yet they did not. Therefore, the temperature in the room did not reach 500 degrees. The police, however, attributed the massive destruction to her body, including the disintegration of her right arm and the right side of her torso, to this less-than-500 degree fire.

Whatever burned off Mary’s right arm and right torso had to be extremely hot! how hot? Who would know what temperature it took to burn a bone? Perhaps someone who cremated bodies for a living. Since I did not know anyone in that line of work, I reached for the yellow pages and looked under “F” for funerals. After several calls, I reached a very personable and articulate man whose job it was to prepare cremated remains for burial.

“What temperature does it take to completely burn a body?” I asked promptly, expecting a quick answer with the precise number of degrees.

“Including bones?” he queried immediately.

“Well, that gets straight to the heart of the matter. Yes, including bones. I am writing a book about someone whose arm was completely burned off in a fire, and I am trying to figure out what temperature would be needed to do that.”

“Burned their arm off?” he exclaimed. “How unusual! What happened to the rest of the body?”

“It was more or less still intact,” I answered cautiously, concerned that he was going to get us off track.

“That’s bizarre,” he said. “I can’t imagine that. Are you sure it wasn’t cut off somehow?”

While he still had not given me the temperature number, I was impressed with how fast he got to the heart of the matter. I had not said anything about the nature of the death. It could have been a car wreck as far as he knew. But I was determined to get a cremation temperature from him before discussing any circumstantial evidence which might somehow color his answer. So I politely asked him to tell me the temperature of a cremation oven.

He said, “Well, the cremation machines are automatic nowadays so you don’t have to set them, but an average cremation takes about two hours at about 1,600 degrees. But when you are finished, there are still bones! Depending on body size and fat content, some take longer. I have seen them as high as 2000 degrees and for as long as three hours. But when you are finished, you still have bones, or at least pieces of bones like joints, skull fragments, and knuckles.

I now had my cremation number, but I was busy thinking about his answers. In the lull, he offered to give me some background on cremations and explained some popular misconceptions. The common belief, he said, it that you put a body in the cremation machine and get back ashes. No, that’s not how it works. Yes, it’s true that there are some ashes produced by burning skin and soft tissue, but that’s a relatively small portion of what remains. Most of what is left after cremation is a box of dry bone parts. The next step is to grind up those remains so that they are unrecognizable. The final product is bone dust, a powdery substance that resembles ashes. Hence, the term and the misconception. What cremation technically does is rapidly dehydrate the bone material so that it splinters. Then it can be ground into a powder more easily. But bones do not burn. To emphasize his point he explained that even the skull cap, which is in the direct path of flame during cremation frequently survives.

While he was being very helpful and I was learning more about cremation than I anticipated, my goal was still to get a temperature figure which would explain Mary’s missing right arm, so I pressed on. “Can you estimate what temperature it would take to completely burn off an arm?”

“Knuckles and all?” he countered.

“Everything,” I confirmed.

“Well, it’s hard to say. Before I got in the business, I saw a lot of burns. Some were military pilots who crashed their jets and got drenched in jet fuel. I would have to get the bodies out of the wreckage. Jet fuel burns at thousands of degrees, but there were still bones left. I also saw people who had been covered with napalm and the like. But there were still bones left. I can’t imagine how hot or how long it would take to completely burn a bone to the point of disintegration, but it’s way up there.”

I was getting his point. If Mary’s entire apartment building had been burning out of control and had caved on top of her body, it could not have produced the type of damage described in the police report. The smokey mattress and the smoldering pile of clothes with their less-than-500 degree temperature were certainly not capable of destroying the bones in Mary’s right arm and rib cage. Then a critical point hit me: The crime scene did not match the crime. It is impossible to explain the damage to Mary’s arm and the right side of her body with the evidence found in her apartment. Or to put it even more bluntly, the damage to Mary’s right arm and thorax did not occur in her apartment. It had to happen somewhere else. Her body was then quietly brought back to her apartment and deposited so it could be found there. A second fire was set to create an explanation, however tenuous, for the burns suffered earlier. It’s no wonder nobody heard anything.

Something else had happened to Mary earlier that evening. It would require something more violent than a common house fire to disintegrate her entire arm and right rib cage. It would take something that could generate thousands, if not millions, of degrees of heat for a fraction of a second, vaporizing and destroying everything in its path. Something more on the scale of lightening or a fireball from an extremely high voltage electrical source which would destroy any tissue in its path, but leave the rest of the body which did not hit relatively intact. Perhaps it was even an extremely powerful beam of high-energy electro-magnetic radiation just like the one that disintegrated electrical engineer Jack Nygard when he accidentally got stuck in the path of his 5,000,000 watt linear particle accelerator near Seattle, Washington….”

There was one lone survivor who worked in this underground bioweapons lab and she wrote a book about it.

Important excerpts from the 600 page book “Me and Lee: How I Came to know, love and lose Lee Harvey Oswald”

(A more accurate title would be “How we were deceived into building a bioweapon…”)

“Then Dr. Ferrie explained that their cancer project was getting results faster than typical research projects, because they did not have to do all the paperwork, and all this was under the direction of the great man himself, Dr. Alton Ochsner.

Dr. Ochsner again. So he was involved in this, too. Dr. Ferrie said Dr. Ochsner knew how to get things done.

He had access to anything needed and avoided red tape by bringing in some materials himself from Latin America. Ferrie described Ochsner’s Latin American connections in more detail, saying that he was the on-call physician for many Latin American leaders. He kept their secrets and got rewarded in return, including big donations to his Clinic. As a result, Ochsner had his own unregulated flow of funds and supplies for every possible kind of cancer research, with no oversight. “We’re using various chemicals, in combination with radiation, to see what happens with fast-growing cancers,” Ferrie said. “We’re using it to mutate monkey viruses too.”
Mutating monkey viruses! Radiation! Fast growing cancers!
“That’s exactly what I’ve been trained to handle,” I commented, noting how conveniently my skill set just happened to match their research.
“I was told you were,” Dr. Ferrie said, without explaining how he came by that particular piece of information, but I figured it had to be Dr. Ochsner… – page 140

The configuration of these labs was basically a circular process which repeated itself over and over. With each lap around the loop of laboratories, the cancer-causing viruses would become more aggressive, and more deadly. Originally, these viruses came from monkeys, but they had been enhanced with radiation. The virus we were most concerned with was SV40, the infamous carcinogenic virus that had contaminated the polio vaccines of the 1950s. But the science of the day was not terribly precise, and cross-infection between species was common in monkey labs. So it was impossible to know if we were working with SV40 only, or a collection of viruses.

We assumed there were probably other viruses traveling with it, but whether it was SV40 or SV37 or SIV did not really matter to us. What mattered was whether it produced cancer quickly. For our project, these cancer causing viruses had been transferred to mice because they were more economical than monkeys, and the viruses thrived just as easily, which is why mice are so widely used in medical research.

This loop included a large colony of thousands of mice kept in a house near Dave Ferrie’s apartment. I called it “the mouse house.” People connected to the Project handled the daily care and feeding of the mice, bred them to replace the population which was constantly being consumed. Several times each week, fifty or so live mice would be selected based upon apparent size of their tumors. These mice had tumors so large that they were visible to the naked eye. They would be placed in a cardboard box and quietly brought through he back door of Dave’s house for processing. Once in Dave’s kitchen, we would kill the mice with ether and harvest their tumors. Harvesting meant cutting their bodies open and excising the largest tumors. The tumors were then weighed, and their weights recorded in a journal. The odor was terrible The largest of the harvested tumors had a destiny. We first cut very thin slices from these tumors and examined them under a microscope. We had to be sure what kind of tumor we had, in each case. Bits of the “best” tumors were selected for individual treatment: each specimen was macerated, stained, mixed with RPMI medium, then poured into a carefully labeled test-tube. These were placed in Dave’s table centrifuge, and spun. Most cancer cells went to the bottom. The liquid on top was poured into a big flask, then more RPMI medium, with fetal calf serum, ad sometimes other materials, was added to each test tube. These were the beginnings of tissue cultures, to be grown elsewhere. – page 208
… Both Dave and Dr. Mary (Dr. Mary Sherman) began describing chilling experiments on human brains being conducted at Tulane by Dr. Robert Health…

Dave said, “Listen to this, J. ‘Dr. Health Tells New Technique. Electrical Impulses Sent Deep Into Brain… [a patient]… had tiny wires implanted into precise spots in his brain. The wires were attached to a self-stimulator box, which was equipped at a push button to deliver a tiny, electrical impulse to the brain…” Dave paused to let what he read sink in. “I wonder how many brains Health went through before he had success with these two. How long did it take to find those ‘precise spots’ in their brains with his hot little wires?”…

“I doubt John Q. Public will ever have a clue,” Dr. Mary replied. “They certainly have no idea they were getting cancer-causing monkey viruses in their polio vaccines,” she added bitterly. Seeing my expression of shock, Dr. Mary went on to explain that she and a few others had privately protested the marketing of the SV40-contaminated polio vaccine, but to no avail. The government continued to allow the distribution of millions of doses of the contaminated vaccine in America and abroad.
She said she was told that the new batches of the vaccine would be free of the cancerous virus, but privately she doubted it, noting that the huge stockpile of vaccines she knew were contaminated had not been recalled. To recall them would damage the public’s confidence, she explained.
I was speechless. Were they telling me that a new wave of cancer was about to wash over the world?
“The government is hiding these facts from the people,” Dave said, “so they won’t panic and refuse to take vaccines. But is it right? Don’t people have the right to be told the contaminant causes cancer in a variety of animals? Instead, they show you pictures in the newspaper of fashion models sipping the stuff, to make people feel safe.”
My mind raced. It was 1963. They had been distributing contaminated polio vaccines since 1955. For eight years! Over a hundred million doses! Even I had received it! A blood-curdling chill came over me…. – page 281

He is soft on Communism. He refuses to go to war. He lets his baby brother go after the Mob, and errant generals. He plans to retire Hoover and wants to tax “Big Oil.” He thinks he can get away with it, because he’s the Commander-in-Chief.”
I caught my breath, and glanced at Dr. Sherman as she began taking dishes from the table. The frown on her face told me they were deadly serious. Dave cleared his throat and coughed. “They’ll execute him,” Dave said, “reminding future Presidents who really controls this country… those who rise to the top will gain everything they ever hoped and look the other way.”
Dave’s hands trembled as he spoke. His nerves were as raw as his voice.
“If Castro dies first, we think the man’s life might be spared.”
“How?” I asked, as the weight of his comments began to sink in.
“If Castro dies, they’ll start jockeying for power over Cuba,” Dave said, “It will divide the coalition that is forming. It may save the man’s life.”
“Where… how did you get this information?” I pursued.
“You’re very young,” Dr. Sherman said. “But you have to trust us, just as we have to trust you. If we were really with them, you wouldn’t be privy to this information. These people have motive, the means, and the opportunity. They will seem as innocent as doves. But they’re deadly as vipers.”
“What about Dr. Ochsner?” I asked.
“I don’t know,” Dr. Sherman said. “I can’t tell, Perhaps…”
“He’s an unknown element,” Dave broke in. “But we know he’s friends with the moneybags. He thinks Mary and I hate ‘the man,’ just as he does.”
“I think he might aid the others,” Dr. Sherman said. “Perhaps without even knowing it. He functions as a go-between. His interest was originally to bring down Castro, because he’s anti-Communist to the core. But he’s remarkably naive.”
Dr. Sherman explained that in the past, Cuban medical students came to the Ochsner Clinic to train. Now Castro was sending Cuba’s medical students to Russia. Ochsner resented this rejection. Some of those medical students realized that studying with Ochsner had made them rich and famous, so they were bitter about Castro’s denying them that right. Some of them were bitter enough to help kill Castro. Dr. Sherman’s comments called to mind Tony’s similar degree of hatred.
“The clock is ticking,” Dave said. “It’s going to require a lot of hard work if we’re going to succeed where all the others failed.”
“We believe we have something,” Dr. Sherman said. “But we want to see what you make of it,” soliciting my opinion and gently stroking my ego with her words. “Dr. Ochsner says you have serendipity.”
“Yes,” I replied. “He told me that.”
“It’s a rare compliment,” Dr. Sherman went on. “You induced lung cancer in mice faster than had ever been done before, under miserable lab conditions. Dr. Sherman reached over and took my hand, squeezing it warmly. “That’s what Ochsner likes about you. Your serendipity. And we know you’re a patriot. That’s why you’re here.”
“This is lung cancer we’re talking about,” Dave said as he began smoking his third cigarette in five minutes. “Your specialty.”
“That’s what they wanted me to work with, ever since Roswell Park,” I admitted.
“You’re untraceable,” Dave continued. “With no degree, nobody will suspect you, because you’re working at Reily’s, and you’re practically a kid.
“We have only until October,” Dr. Sherman said.
“Maybe the end of October,” Dave amended, as he snubbed out his half-smoked cigarette.
“You can choose not to participate,” Dr. Sherman told me.
“Yeah, we’ll just send you over to Tulane to see Dr. Heath. A few days in his tender care, and you’ll never even remember this conversation took place,” Dave said.
“You’re not funny! Sherman snapped at Dave, seeing my face. “Of course, nothing will happen to you, Judy. Dr. Ferrie and I are the visible ones, not you.
“Hell, I was joking,” Dave said.
“She is so young,” Dr. Sherman said reproachfully. “You frightened her.”
“I’m sorry, J.” He said. “What are you, nineteen?”
“I will be twenty, on the 15th,” I said softly.
Dr. Mary saw that I was trembling. She poured me a little glass of cordial and offered it to me, saying that it would relax me, but I declined to drink it.
“All I came here for was to have an internship with you, Dr. Sherman,” I said, adding that I still wanted to go to Tulane Medical School in the fall.
“Don’t worry, you’ll be there,” Dr. Sherman said. “Dr. Ochsner said he’ll sponsor you. That’s set in stone. – page 283 – 284
With the early-week crunch over, I took myself over to Dave’s lab and Mary Sherman’s apartment on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday to continue our work on the Project. When I finished, as per instructions from Dr. Mary, I wrapped the specimens in newspaper to insulate them and dropped them in a car parked near Eli Lilly on my way back to Reily’s. That was usually Lee’s job, but this week I did it. Once the product was dropped off a driver would get into the car and whisk it away for another round of radiation, presumable at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital. – page 315

Dr. Ochsner wanted to speed up the Project. He called me at Reily’s several times to ask for ideas. I offered him several. One recommendation was that we try to transfer from mice to monkeys again, but this time the monkeys should be exposed to radiation beforehand to suppress their immune systems. Ochsner liked the idea and noted that they had concentrated their radiation efforts on tissue cultures, not living hosts. I was surprised they had not done this earlier, since I had told them back in 1961 that I had used this method to develop cancer in mice more rapidly. So I recommended irradiating the monkeys to expedite things, and Dr. Ochsner agreed. – page 320

As an Executive Director at the International Trade Mart, Clay Shaw was at the center of the international trade community in New Orleans. Shaw’s mentors, Ted Brent and Lloyd Cobb, had deep connections to both Dr. Ochsner and the CIA. Connections between Dr. Ochsner and Ted Brent were so strong that Brent left the fortune he had amassed during his lifetime to Ochsner Clinic upon his death. The hotel on campus of Ochsner Clinic is named Brent House, in his honor. – page 325

That afternoon, Mr. Monaghan agreed to clock me and Lee out, so we could meet at 4:30 near Eli Lilly..

“Nobody should be denied medical care,” he said. “It’s a basic human right! Just as the right to own a house. The people in this country are serfs and slaves… And hell, if they get sick and are new in town, they can drop dead. Nobody cares. We’re living in a world as barbaric as ancient Rome!”

“Maybe Rome had some things better,” I offered, noting Rome had heated floors and trained doctors two thousand years ago. That led to Lee’s taking out the book, Everyday life in Ancient Rome, from the library for us to study.

About the same time, Lee created a fake health card for himself so he’d have vaccination ‘proof’— necessary for travel to backward countries. His vaccinations were up-to-date, thanks to Dr. Ochsner, but he couldn’t put that name on his health card. Instead he used the fake name “Dr. A.J. Hideel.” There was that name again! I’d seen it on the third floor at Banister’s, and a variation on a fake FPCC membership card Lee carried. “Hidell,” Lee told me, was a ‘project name’ used on fake ID’s to access certain funds. Further, he said he was not the only person using the name….
“Dr. Mary noticed me staring at the equipment.

“The marmosets are dying,” she told me somberly. “All of them, including our control group.”

I pondered the implications. Our bioweapon had migrated between the two groups of monkeys, presenting the terrifying possibility that our mutated cancer was not only transferable, but actually contagious. We both knew that from this moment on we needed to be concerned about being exposed to a contagious, cancer-causing virus.

For the next hour, I worked with the microscopes, until Dave showed up. As my eyes were tired, I decided to help Lee, whose hands were now thrust inside the clean box’s gloves, and leave the microscope work to Dr. Mary. I bent down and kissed his perspiring forehead.

“You shouldn’t touch me,” he said, through his face mask.

“I’m going to help,” I told him, putting on my lab coat. I could see a book in Lee’s pocket through the clear plastic apron. “I see you brought along Profiles of Courage,” I said to Lee, hoping he was finished with it, and I could borrow it from him.

“I’m trying to get my hands on everything I can about ‘The Chief,’” Lee answered… – page 386

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

I received an important call at Reily’s from Dr. Bowers, who told me Dr. Ochsner had asked him to relay the good news to me. He said that cells isolated from two of the lymphoma strains from the mice had produced dramatic results in the marmoset monkeys. They suffered from not one, but two variations of a galloping cancer. We had broken the barrier between mouse and monkey. Now we could move on to specific types of lung cancers, but would need to keep the mouse cancers going, in case a failure occurred, when we moved from marmoset monkeys to African Green monkeys. – page 383

“All right,” I said. “What agency do you really work for, and who is your most important handler?”

“You little spy!” he said, smiling. “Here’s the answer: I’m loaned to the CIA, and must sometimes help the FBI; but who my main handler is, not even God knows the answer to that. Certainly, I don’t. I call him “Mr. B.”

“As for me,” I told him, “I’m just a pair of hands belonging to Ochsner.”

“They don’t belong to Ochsner anymore,” Lee said. “They’re mine now.”

I asked him if I had a “handler.” Lee said, smiling, “Of course you do. It’s me.” He said I was a lucky woman. “I shall be your protector,” he said. “I won’t let any of them hurt you.”

I asked why would anybody want to hurt me? I was on the ‘good’ side. Lee explained: if you’re no longer useful, you could be thrown out, unless you were educated.

“You’re safer than I am,” he told me. “Officially, you were supposedly an unwitting asset. A good position to be in… – page 389

Lee asked if there was anything he still didn’t know about the cancer research project. “Well, you should know about the etiology of the cancer,” I told him. “I’ve never discussed it with you.”

“Etiology? What’s that mean?”
“Etiology means origins. This is no ordinary cancer, as you know,” I reminded him He agreed.

“It’s probably contagious,” I went on. That startled him, since Dr. Mary and I had not really discussed this point explicitly in front of him. I told him that the monkey virus, now altered by radiation, had moved spontaneously from the deliberately infected marmoset monkeys to the control animals. With it came cancer and all the marmoset monkeys were now dying. That’s why there were suddenly all the extra precautions in Dave’s lab.

“Remind me not to eat or drink anything over at Dave’s,” Lee said soberly as he pondered the idea of working around a contagious cancer virus…

“We’ve created a galloping cancer,” I went on. “I think a bacteriophage could be altered to take out even these cancer cells. But nobody’s going down that road. We’re developing this weapon to eliminate a head of state. But what if we get Castro? Will they really just throw this stuff away? I asked, shivering at the thought.

“It could be used as a weapon of mass destruction,” Lee answered simply…

Lee asked how many people understood the science behind the Project. I told him Ochsner, Sherman, Dave and I surely knew how it was made and that I knew there were some other doctors involved, but once the bioweapon was created, it could be kept frozen for years and used by anyone who had access to it at some point in the future. We sank into deep silence as we contemplated the dimensions of what we had just said. How had my dream to cure cancer gone so wrong? – pages 390 – 391

July 19, 1963 Friday

That morning, Lee was on the Magazine Street bus with me in time to arrive at Reily’s before 8:00 A.M…. I clocked in shortly before 8:00 A.M., but I needed Lee to run an errand to Eli Lilly’s for the Project, so despite his efforts to be on time, he clocked in late again and got chewed out. For the rest of the day, Lee’s supervisors were all over him.

Lee advised Dave to keep an eye on me, but not to say a word—unless I got up to leave— until he got there. I gave Dave Lewis a grateful hug, then followed Lee to an old car that he had access to for the day, due to his training film project. This was an unusual car called a Kaiser-Frazer, which was discontinued in 1951. It was a roomy and surprisingly luxurious dark green 4-door sedan. I had seen it parked near the Eli Lilly office several times.

“You might want to take me to take you straight home,” Lee said, “if you’re too tired. But if you come along with me, you’ll get to see Carlos Marcello’s plantation.”…

This meeting was necessary, because it was time to test the Project’s biological weapon on primates. It had worked on the Marmoset monkeys, so it was time to try it on African green monkeys, which were closer to humans but considerably more expensive. These next steps involved the precise work that needed to be done in the monkey laboratory, so others would do that.

I had to discuss the details with Dr. Ochsner. After much of this technical talk, Ochsner said, “By the way, your boy Oswald is going to be a movie star.”

“I know he’s working on a film,” I said cautiously, not knowing how much Ochsner was privy to.

“I don’t mean out there,” Ochsner said suggesting that he knew about the training camp. “I mean here in New Orleans, on TV. Do you have a TV set?”…

“Sir,” I said proudly, “he doesn’t spend a dollar of the Project’s money unless he has to. He’s a patriot of the first order.”

“Well, he’s all of that,” Ochsner agreed. “I don’t deny it. I’ve taken the trouble to look into his records. And I’m thinking about better ways to use his talents.”

“He wants to go to college, sir,” I said. “Can you help him?”

“Young lady, we want him to stay put a while, where he’s most useful.” Realizing that he was clearly talking about using Lee as a spy, I realized that Ochsner thought of himself as part of the management of that operation, not just a technical resource working for Lee’s spymasters.

“So, who am I really working for?” I asked Ochsner bluntly. He shook his head from side to side in dismay and said that I was asking a lot of questions today, as if talking to a wall.

Then, he turned to me and said: “You’re working for the foes of Communism.” After a short pause, he smiled and added, “I’m not ashamed to say that I would spill every drop of blood I have for my country. And I have always known that you feel the same way.”

Ochsner then glanced at his watch, cut me off with a wave of his hand, and handed me a stack of new material to read. “Read these for us, and give us your input as soon as possible. The final step will be with our human volunteer.”

“Have you already found one?” I queried.

“You would be surprised,” Dr. Ochsner replied, standing up and learning me to the door. “There are many unsung heroes who have bravely stepped forward to accomplish the impossible.” Then he added, a little sadly. “There are risks that must be taken for great causes.”

“Am I doing alright, sir?” I asked meekly. “It feels strange, not preparing for Tulane yet. I mean, all I’ve looked at for months now are cancer cells.”
As for Lee and me, we wanted to abandon the rat race to others. “We’ll leave their money and corruption behind,” Lee said. “We’ll be like Lord and Lady Blakeney. We’ll play the old part… “Maybe I could talk to Dr. Diehl,” I said hopefully. Dr. Harold Diehl had been fond of me, and I knew I could talk to him in private. He had concerns for safety in cancer research. I found his card in my black purse.

But Lee pointed out that Diehl, the Senior Vice President for Research for the American Cancer Society and Ochsner the former ACS President, had been pals for years. Their friend, “Wild Bill” Donovan (who died of cancer despite Ochsner’s efforts) had been a leading ACS official, too, and was the founding father of the CIA. Diehl would probably do nothing. – page 457 – 458

I personally trained Lee and Dave to handle the materials and prepared the bioweapon for safe transport to the mental hospital, but I did not accompany them on this first trip, so what I report here is what Lee and Dave told me…

Lee and Dave were both qualified to instruct other technicians as to how to handle and work with the bioweapon. At Jackson, Dave gave the injections and explained to those involved how further injections should be given, and when. Lee watched and listened, so he would be able to deliver similar instructions when he handed off the Product in Mexico City or Cuba. Lee left after viewing the first round of injections, and one saw one prisoner, because he needed to go to the Personnel office. There, Lee filled out an employment application to establish a motive for his planned return to the hospital in about 72 hours, when he would have to drive me there to check on the progress of the experiment. Afterwards, Shaw drove Lee and Dave home.

But here was the problem: I was originally told that the prisoner was terminally ill and had “volunteered” to be injected with cancerous cells, knowing his days were numbered. But, a simple fact remained: in order to do my blood test, I had to know what kind of cancer the volunteer had so I could distinguish between “his cancer” and “our cancer.” Right before the Team left for Jackson, I asked Dave to find out what kind of cancer the prisoner had.

“Oh, don’t worry about that,” Dave said matter-of-factly. “He doesn’t have cancer. He’s a Cuban who is about the same age and weight as Castro, and he’s healthy.”

I felt a chill sweep through my body. My heart turned over. This revelation was sickening to me. We would be giving cancer to a healthy human with the intention of killing him. This was not medicine, it was murder. It was wrong, morally, ethically, and legally. They had gone too far….

My note to Dr. Ochsner simply stated: Injecting disease-causing materials into an unwitting subject who does not have a disease is unethical. I signed it with my initials, J.A., and hand delivered it to Dr. Ochsner’s office at his Clinic…

“I’m so sorry,” she told me. “He’s making a mountain out of a molehill.” This was a hint that Dr. Mary was still on my side, which was a huge relief to me. I hoped she would give me good references to a medical school in Latin America, which was one of the plans Lee and I considered. The only positive note she had to offer was that Dr. Ochsner had agreed to a civil exit interview… – page 470

When Dr. Ochsner entered the room, the look on his face was unforgiving. Without a word, he handed me some important blood work code sheets, with which to make my reports. Then, rising to his feet, he exploded into a flurry of unrestrained verbal abuses. It was unlike anything I had ever encountered…

“When you finish your assignment at Jackson,” he said, “Give us the results and consider your work with us over. After his ruse burned a little further, he said, “Consider yourself lucky you’re walking out with your teeth still in your head. Now get out.” – page 472 – 473

“This was the same old Kaiser-Frazer that Lee (as in Lee Harvey Oswald) had used to drive me to Churchill Farms for Marcello’s gathering. I thought of it as the Eli Lilly car, because I had seen in parked near their building several times. Lee said it was more reliable than Dave’s car and it had no known mechanical problems.” – Me and Lee page 476.

The plan to kill Castro depended on two to three people: First, a doctor to influence diagnostics for the required x-rays, then an x-ray technician to rig the machine to temporarily deliver a dangerous dose, (creating symptoms of an infection and pulling down the immune system) and someone to contaminate the penicillin shots given to overcome the presumed ‘pneumonia’ or ‘infection’, with the deadly cancer cocktail. Reactions to the foreign material would bring on fever, with more x-rays to check for ‘pneumonia’ —and more penicillin or similar shots. Only one shot had to reach a vein, and it was over, if the X-rays had been used. For this was a galloping cancer: Castro’s chances, if it worked in humans as it did in monkeys, were zero. It had killed the African green monkeys in only two weeks. Castro’s death by cancer would be ascribed to “natural causes.”

Lee told me that after the cancer cells were removed from their glass container, he then observed the volunteer being x-rayed and injected. After that, Dave asked him to leave. Why? This made Lee suspicious… – page 477

I checked the blood work data while a centrifuge spun down the rest of the freshly-drawn blood samples to pellets, inspecting slides and the blood counts already prepared for me. My task was to match the recorded data with the slides, and to look for any cancer cells there. A few were present—an excellent sign that the bioweapon worked. The original cancer cells had been tagged with a radioactive tracer. If any of those were also found in the pellets, the volunteer was surely doomed. But there were too many blood samples for just one client. …

Having done that, I insisted that I needed to observe the prisoner’s current condition to see how he was physically reacting. The orderly reluctantly took me to the door of the prisoner’s room, but said that I was not allowed past the door. The room was barred, but basically clean. Several storage boxes sat on the floor and some flowers sat on a stand next to the bed. The patient was tied to the bed and was thrashing around in an obvious fever. It was very sad and I felt sorry for what I had done, but I played my part and pretended to be pleased with his status.

We had spent no more than forty-five minutes at the hospital, and once back in the car, Lee and I discussed what I had seen. I told him that I was almost sure there was more than one “volunteer.” Lee asked me to describe the patient to him, which I did. Lee then pointed out that the hairline and nose were different from the patient that he had seen injected. Between Lee’s comments and the number of variety of blood samples, I became convinced. More than one “volunteer” had been injected to test the effectiveness of the bioweapon. – page 479 – 481

A car and driver was waiting outside of International House to take Lee and Hugh Ward to an airport in Houma, Louisiana (about an hour southwest of New Orleans). But first, they had to pick up a package from the nearby offices of Eli Lilly that needed to be delivered to someone in Austin. After getting the package from Eli Lilly, the trio headed to the Huoma-Terre-bonne Airport, known to locals as “the blimp station.” Lee said they reached the blimp station without undue delay. – page 495

It said that Alex Rorke had “run into some trouble,” and he and his pilot might be “missing.”

This was instantly a concern to Lee because, not only was Alex Rorke one of his trusted friends from his nefarious anti-Castro world, he was also the man who was going to fly me from Florida to Mexico when it was time for Lee and me to disappear, which might be this week.. The Latinos, meanwhile were eating lunch with some anti-Castro friends and had promised to seek news about Alex Rorke. When they returned, they dropped Lee at the Trek Cafe on South Congress Avenue, where he waited for about forty-five minutes while they dropped off the package from Eli Lilly in the biology building at St. Edward’s University – page 496 & 497

He deposited one of his two suitcases in a locker in the bus station, so he would have some clothes to wear when he returned to Mexico. It was now obvious to Lee that he had been betrayed, and his actions at the consulate would further stain him as a pro-Castro fanatic, making him an even more convincing patsy in Kennedy’s murder.

“They think I’m a blind fool!” Lee told me soon after. “If they don’t want me for Cuba anymore, I’m better off dead than alive to them.” – page 501

“You’ll be working a lot of hours,” Dave warned me.

“So what?” I mused, thinking I’d be happy creating exotic chemicals for esoteric scientific projects. Dave had told me that some of these would be sent to New Orleans via such routes as the Mound Park Hospital in St. Petersburg, Eastman Kodak, and our familiar chemical supplier, Eli Lilly, including materials similar to antifreeze, which could be used to safely deep-freeze the deadly cancer cell lines, keeping alive virtually forever. page 503- 504
When I heard his strained voice, I realized that something sinister was blowing in the wind…

“I won’t live to see another birthday cake,” he said quietly, “unless I can get out of here. And if I don’t do it right, we’ll all get killed.”

To my gasp of horror, he added, “I’m sorry. You have to hear it.” I now learned that upon his return to Dallas, Lee had been invited to be an actual participant in the assassination plans against JFK.

“You know what that means,” he warned me. I did.

“So, you’re going to go through with it?”

“I’m going to have to go through with it. Who else is in position to penetrate this, and stop it?”

I started to cry, feeling both hopeless and helpless.

“Don’t cry,” he said. “It’s killing me! I can’t stand your crying like that.”

I suddenly felt faint, and accidentally dropped the phone. When I picked up the phone again, we tried to comfort each other. But then Lee revealed that he had decided to send on any information he could about the assassination ring. He was convinced that his information could make a huge difference.

Lee was spending evenings with men who were plotting the death of the President of the United States— men who would stop at nothing to gain more power. They might even be able to blame it on Castro, impelling Americans to war against Cuba, and thus killing two big birds with one big stone. Lee and I both believed that an invasion of Cuba could trigger WWIII, if Russia moved in to defend her Communist ally in the Caribbean.

“I know you think I’m a good shot,” he told me. “Truth is, I’m not that good. So why would they recruit me?”

Lee made a bitter laugh. “They’ll set me up. You see how they hung me out to dry in Mexico City?” he went on. “Now they’ve put off my return to Mexico until after Christmas. I’m going to be snuffed, just as I told you, way back.”

But he felt he had to stay on, with so much as stake. There was now no way to persuade Lee to save himself. In fact, he would have thought it immoral of me to suggest it at the expense of President Kennedy. – page 505

The plot against President Kennedy thickened in November. By now, Lee had convinced me that Kennedy was a great president who sought peace, and I shared Lee’s fear that his life would soon end. Lee had been recruited in the Baton Rouge meetings into the Dallas plot. He had penetrated the ring. Now, he was meeting with one or more plotters on a regular basis. “But I’m meeting too many people,” he told me…

Lee said the motorcade would turn at the 3600 block “because the plotters want to show their power… that they are in charge of their trophy. They would also be taking trophy photos of the assassination.

At this time, Lee believed the kill site would probably be the Dallas Trade Mart—if Kennedy wasn’t terminated earlier in Chicago or Miami. Sickening to me and Lee was their plan to circulate a photo of JFK’s head, “dead, with his eyes left open.” – page 515

Saturday, November 16, 1963

Lee met with an FBI contact at a location unknown to me, revealing that a right-wing group was planning to assassinate President Kennedy during his visit to Dallas on November 22nd. Someone in the FBI took the information seriously and sent out a teletype message to field offices that night. William Walter, a clerk in the FBI office in New Orleans, saw this telex the following morning and later affirmed he had seen this document to Jim Garrison when he investigated the JFK assassination in the late 1960s. The FBI claimed it could find no copies of such a document, but that hardly surprises me. – page 516
“Know how we wondered who my handler was?” Lee whispered. “Mr. B? Benson, Benton, or Bishop? Well, he’s from Fort Worth, so it has to be Phillips. His is the traitor. Phillips is behind this. I need you to remember that name,” Lee said, repeating it with cold anger. “David Atlee Phillips.”

Lee then said there were two other names I needed to remember: Bobby Baker and Billy Sol Estes. He said the assassination itself was not their doing, but it was because of them, and I was never to forget their names…

“They’d just get another gun to take my place,” Lee said. “If I stay, that will be one less bullet aimed at Kennedy.” – page 521

“Maybe I can still do something,” he added, grasping at a straw, “but what bothers me the most is that they’re going to say I did it. They’re going to pin it on me. And what will my babies think of me, when they grow up?” – page 523

I went to work at PenChem, as I’d done every day for the previous six weeks….

Shortly after 1:30 P.M. Florida time (12:30 P.M. Dallas time), the television erupted with an announcement that the President had been seriously wounded by gunfire in Dallas. Soon, the network cut away from its regular programming. I can’t remember the words; I only remember my horror. About a half-hour later, we heard news that a priest had given his last rites. The news was greeted with cheers and whistles of approval in the lab. Tears started running down my cheeks, despite my efforts to hide them…

Mr. Mays noticed. “Are you a God-damned Communist?” – page 526 – 527

The phone rang as soon as I reached it. Dave was as nervous as I was and apologized for calling a few minutes early. I told him I was glad he did. Then I heard Dave make a sound as though he were choking. I realized he was swallowing back his tears. “Oh, my God, J,” he said to me. “I won’t hide it from you.”

Dave was crying. I started crying, too. I didn’t think I had any tears left, but there they were, stinging my eyes. I was so anxious to hear what he had to say.

“It’s hopeless. If you want to stay alive,” Dave warned me, with a strained voice, “it’s time to go into the catacombs. Promise me you will keep your mouth shut!” he added. “I don’t want to lose you, too,” he said, his voice choking on his words. I felt weak all over. “If there is any chance to save him, we’ll get him out of there, I swear to you. So play the dumb broad, and save yourself. Remember, Mr. T will watch every step you make.

Dave meant I was being watched by “Santos” Trafficante, the Godfather of Tampa and Miami. He was also a good friend and ally of Carlos Marcello. Fortunately, Marcello liked me, which is why I believed that I had a chance to survive any threats from that direction.

“I’ll call you one more time. After that, I can’t call anymore,” Dave said “And now I have other calls to make. So, Vale, Soror” (“Be strong, sister.”) – page 530 – 531
“The Texas Court of Appeals overturned Jack Ruby’s conviction and on December 7, 1966 ordered a new trial to be held outside of Dallas. Two days later, Ruby became ill and entered Parkland Hospital where doctors initially thought he had pneumonia, but quickly changed their diagnosis to lung cancer. Before the week was over, the Parkland doctors announced that Ruby’s lung cancer had advanced so far that it could not be treated (meaning it had spread to other parts of the body—Stage IV). The median survival time of a patient with Stage IV lung cancer is eight months, but twenty-seven days after the onset of his initial symptoms of cough and nausea, Jack Ruby was dead. Deputy Sheriff Al Maddox was Ruby’s jailer at the time. He later told researchers that Jack Ruby told him of being injected with cancer and handed him a note making that claim. Maddox also remembered what he described as a “phony doctor” had visited Ruby shortly before he became sick. A second law enforcement officer said Ruby had been placed in an x-ray room for about 15 minutes with the x-ray machine running constantly, an action that would have certainly compromised his immune system. The autopsy found the main concentration of cancer cells to be in Ruby’s right lung, but noted that cancer cells had spread throughout his body. These cells were sent to nearby Southwest Medical School for closer scrutiny using an electron microscope. Bruce McCarty, the electron microscope operator that examined Ruby’s cells had microvilli (tentacle-like extensions that grow out of the main cell), since microvilli were normally not seen in lung cancers. A decade later, however, cancer researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York noted that when cancer cells of various types and origins were suspended in specialized liquids they would form microvilli extensions “when settling on glass.” This is consistent with my description of the need to separate their suspended cancer cells from the sides of the glass thermos every couple days.” – page 561

Former CIA Asset Antonio Veciana independently confirms what Lee told Judyth in his book, “Trained to Kill: The Inside Story of CIA Plots Against Castro, Kennedy, and Che.”

Preface
Bishop knew I was responsible for the arsons that destroyed some of Havana’s best-known department stores, which led to something I could never forgive myself for, the death of an innocent mother of two,… Bishop knew I was responsible for sparking the mass exodus of thousands of Cuban children known as “Operation Pedro Pan”— disguised as orphans, and with the help of the Catholic Church. Bishop knew I came close to collapsing Cuba’s economy with a rumor campaign meant to sow panic….. My name is Antonio Veciana. I am an accountant by training, a banker and businessman by trade. Some call me a patriot. Some call me a terrorist. Only one knew I was a spy, with a single mission—destroy Castro. My CIA handler, the man I knew as Maurice Bishop. The man whom congressional investigators later identified as master spy David Atlee Phillips. The man whom I saw meeting with Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas.

Chapter 3: The Bearded Ones

When Fidel Castro came to power in Cuba on January 1, 1959, David Atlee Phillips was already there…
I had left the Banco Nacional before Fidel declared victory. I went to work for Julio Lobo, the richest man in Cuba. Lobo was Cuba’s first millionaire and, at the time of the revolution, its richest man. His personal fortune was so immense, people in Havana and Miami still wistfully exclaim, “To be as rich as Julio Lobo!”….
As my trial drew closer, my attorney had more questions… I remember thinking how curious it was that someone would conspire to smuggle drugs with someone they thought worked for the government—especially someone with the CIA.. I was convicted on all three counts on January 14, 1974. The judge sentenced me to two concurrent terms of seven years, plus three years of probation…
They released me after twenty-six months. I got home in February 1976, just as the House Select Committee on Assassinations was beginning its work. Soon after my return, committee investigator Gaeton Fonzi started calling my house, asking to see me. We met for the first time at the beginning of March. He didn’t mention the Kennedy assassination. He said he wanted to ask about connections between groups like Alpha 66 and U.S. Intelligence agencies.
I ended up telling him about Bishop. The whole story. About Cuba and the attempt to kill Castro with the bazooka, about Bishop telling me to found Alpha 66, about Chile. And I told him about meeting Lee Harvey Oswald.
Gaeton tried not to look surprised. He tried not to let his excitement show in his voice. But as he himself told it later, “In my mind, I fell off my chair.”
That’s because he hadn’t been fully honest with me when he introduced himself. He was investigating links between anti-Castro groups and the CIA. That was true. But he was actually interested in the assassination. AS an HSCA investigator, he was precisely charged with looking into whether U.S. intelligence agencies had anything to do with Kennedy’s death.
And I had just given him the thing so many suspected, and so many feared, but no one had found before—a direct link between a significant CIA figure and John Kennedy’s alleged assassin, or at least the “patsy” for the crime, as Oswald called himself…
Before the House Select Committee on Assassinations finished its work, someone tried to silence me. With a bullet.
I had testified in secret before a congressional panel. I told them about the assassination attempts against Castro and about El Che’s diary. I told them about Alpha 66 and about Oswald. And I told them how a man I knew only as Maurice Bishop had been responsible for it all…. Fonzi and other committee investigators were able to confirm much of what I told them. The committee had also determined that, even though the CIA insisted I had never been one of its operatives, the agency’s records contained a “piece of arguably contradictory evidence—a record of $500 in operational expenses, given to Veciana by a person with whom the CIA had maintained a long-standing operational relationship.”..
Police said the gunman used a .45-caliber silencer. The first shot had come through the side mirror, splintering on its way through. A piece of it had hit me. It lodged above my ear… The doctors said the bullet that grazed my belly was the one that could have killed me.
“You’re lucky they used a .45,” one of the cops told me. “The .45 comes out of the barrel slower. If they used a 9 mm you’d be dead.”
Epilogue
I knew who “Bishop” really was the instant I saw David Phillip’s photograph.
Why didn’t I say so then?
I was afraid.
I believe there was a conspiracy to kill Kennedy. And I believe that even if David Atlee Phillips wasn’t part of it, he knew about it. He had to. Why else would he have met with Oswald in Dallas, less than three months before the assassination? And why else would he have asked me to help connect Oswald with the Cuban Embassy in Mexico?…

Eli Lilly was instrumental in creating the bioweapon intended to kill Fidel Castro. They provided all the supplies. They also held exclusive rights to the US distribution of thalidomide that John F Kennedy warned women about on national TV. (Eli Lilly acquired Distillers in 1962.) Kennedy had an actual scientist heading the FDA who rejected the approval of thalidomide in the US. Didn’t stop Eli Lilly from distributing 2 million pills directly to physicians who gave them out like candy to pregnant mothers. Eli Lilly was also the last supplier of DES and were fully aware that it was banned for chickens in the 50s for causing massive biological harm. Eli Lilly is still the last distributor of rBST or rRBGH the petroleum-based synthetic hormone chemical pumped into poor cows that destroys their health and contaminates our dairy supplies…

“Thimerosal is an organic compound that is 49.6 percent ethylmercury. Eli Lilly and Co., the Indianapolis-based drug giant, developed and registered thimerosal under its trade name Merthiolate in 1929 and began marketing it as an antibacterial, antifungal product. It became the most widely used preservative in vaccines….

By 1935, Eli Lilly’s Jameison had further evidence of thimerosal’s toxicity when he received a letter from a researcher who had injected it into dogs and saw severe local reactions, leading him to state: “Merthiolate is unsatisfactory as a preservative for serum intended for use on dogs.”

http://inthesetimes.com/article/649/eli_lilly_and_thimerosal

“Lilly’s patent on thimerosal is about up, Kirby said, and it is still used in flu shots administered to children in doses that “contain 25 micrograms of mercury, which is more than what a 500-pound person could handle, according to the EPA.”

The Mystery of the Eli Lilly Rider

The Eli Lilly rider was attached to the Homeland Security Act for a reason… zero liability for damages..

“… the Dick Ammey “Lilly Rider” slipped into the 2002 Homeland Security Act, and the FDA’s approval to double the doses of aluminum adjuncts in several vaccines.” – Master Manipulator: The Explosive True Story of Fraud, Embezzlement, and Government Betrayal at the CDC by James Ottar Grundvig (Page 257)

Researchers show where the aluminum travels to in the body and stays after vaccination

https://nexusnewsfeed.com/article/human-rights/researchers-show-where-the-aluminum-travels-to-in-the-body-and-stays-after-vaccination/

Deadly shots: the polio vaccine saga
The eight scientists gathered in the meeting room at the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories in Melbourne included the key researchers who had helped turn the tide in the fight against polio in Australia.
But the mood was far from celebratory as the meeting started on May 1, 1962. The team responsible for developing and producing the local version of the Salk polio vaccine in 1956, which had been given to millions of Australians during the following years, was faced with a crisis.
Four days earlier CSL biochemist John Withell had completed laboratory tests that confirmed what had been feared: the latest batch of polio vaccine was contaminated with a newly discovered virus that came from monkey kidneys used to produce it.
The virus had been designated SV40 – the 40th simian virus that had been identified – but this virus, first discovered by British researchers the previous year, was different. Tests in the United States had shown it could cause aggressive cancers in small animals and was not killed in the normal process used to manufacture polio vaccine.
In the words of Withell, who went on to become head of the government’s Therapeutic Goods Administration laboratories in Canberra, SV40 “was recognised straight away as a fairly nasty virus”.

“In April, more than 60 scientists met in Chicago to discuss the controversial virus and how it works to defeat certain cells’ natural defenses against cancer.

“I believe that SV40 is carcinogenic (in humans),” said Dr. Michele Carbone of Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. “We need to be creating therapies for people who have these cancers, and now we may be able to because we have a target – SV40.”

For four decades, government officials have insisted that there is no evidence the simian virus called SV40 is harmful to humans. But in recent years, dozens of scientific studies have found the virus in a steadily increasing number of rare brain, bone and lung-related tumors – the same malignant cancer SV40 causes in lab animals.

Even more troubling, the virus has been detected in tumors removed from people never inoculated with the contaminated vaccine, leading some to worry that those infected by the vaccine might be spreading SV40.

“How long can the government ignore this?” asked Dr. Adi Gazdar, a University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center cancer researcher. “The government has not sponsored any real research. Here’s something possibly affecting millions of Americans, and they’re indifferent.

“Maybe they don’t want to find out.”

https://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Rogue-virus-in-the-vaccine-Early-polio-vaccine-2899957.php

You should ask yourself how exactly is polio transmitted?
Virus particles are excreted in the feces for several weeks following initial infection.[23] The disease is transmitted primarily via the fecal-oral route, by ingesting contaminated food or water.
Then you should ask yourself how does this contaminated poo get in water and food supplies in the first place?
American citizens should seriously ask themselves do you really want to inject a Gates created fast track vaccine into your babies and children from someone with this track record and business partners?
A reminder about Gates….
BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION KICKED OUT OF INDIA
Yes, the Microsoft founder and the icon of the Third-World Humanitarianism has been kicked out of India as his fraud was called out. He came to India posing as a philanthropist and humanitarian helping the Third-World poor people by alleviating their conditions and yes, of course, “VACCINATING” their children.
But, only a couple of years earlier suspicions started to emerge. As, reports of their themselves being heavily invested in the companies which were manufacturing those vaccines started to appear. Native Indian doctors and health activists started raising objections as the illegality of the testing of those vaccines on poor children started to come out into the open. Suspicions arose that he may have committed a crime against humanity by illegally testing vaccines on poor innocent children. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation had been facing trials in the Supreme Court of India since then and a couple of months earlier they were kicked out of this country. So that, they could no longer kill innocent poor Indian children by illegal vaccine testing.
(Merck, Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Dow Chemical, and Company won’t be disseminating that information in their US media and education controlled systems…)
“Controversial vaccine studies: Why is Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation under fire from critics in India?
The vaccine used was Gardasil, manufactured by Merck. It was administered to around 16,000 girls in the district, many of whom stayed in state government-run hostels meant for tribal students….
When a team of health activists from an NGO that specializes in women’s health named Sama visited Khammam in March 2010 on a fact-finding mission, they were told that as many as 120 girls experienced adverse reactions such as epileptic seizures, severe stomach ache, headaches and mood swings. The Sama report also said there had been cases of early onset of menstruation following the vaccination, heavy bleeding and severe menstrual cramps among many students. The standing committee pulled up the relevant state governments for the shoddy investigation into these deaths. It said it was disturbed to find that “all the seven deaths were summarily dismissed as unrelated to vaccinations without in-depth investigations…”
‘Globally-supported company is funding fatal polio shots’
ISLAMABAD:
A government inquiry has found that polio vaccines for infants funded by the Global Alliance for Vaccination and Immunisation are causing deaths and disabilities in regional countries including Pakistan.
The startling revelation is part of an inquiry report prepared by the Prime Minister’s Inspection Commission (PMIC) on the working of the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). The PMIC, headed by Malik Amjad Noon, has recommended that Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani immediately suspend the administration of all types of vaccines funded by the GAVI.
The commission also recommended launching an inquiry to find out facts leading to the agreement with GAVI without examining the safety of the vaccines. The report also established that the GAVI-funded vaccines are not only causing deaths in many countries but are also very expensive.
There have been reports of deaths of a number of children and occurrence of other side-effects soon after the vaccination is administered in Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and Japan.
Geneva-based officials of GAVI, Jeffrey Rowland and Dan Thomas, were contacted by e-mail but they did not respond.
The report stated that five deaths have been reported in Japan this year soon after the vaccination was administered while 25 serious adverse reactions, including five deaths, were reported in Sri Lanka in 2008. Consequently, the vaccine was withdrawn. Bhutan also withdrew the vaccines after the deaths of children. The Association of Parents of Disabled Children from Bosnia and Herzegovina filed criminal charges after the GAVI-funded vaccines caused disabilities.
The report states, “The procured vaccines are not tested in laboratories to confirm their efficacy and genuineness..
GAVI’s partners include certain countries, the Bill and Melinda Gates Children’s Vaccine Programme, International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, Rockefeller Foundation, United Nations Children’s Fund, World Health Organisation and the World Bank, the report says.
The government of Switzer­land may be requested to investigate GAVI’s activities to find out whether it is really a non-profit organisation, as it professes.

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Poisoned Water

PBS Airdate: May 31, 2017

NARRATOR: In Flint, Michigan, officials try to save money by changing the city’s water source, but instead endanger public health.

GINA LUSTER (Flint Resident): We were so sick.

LEEANNE WALTERS (Flint Resident): We were experiencing hair loss. We realized it wasn’t just our home.

SIDDHARTHA ROY (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University): People are getting poisoned, because you’re not treating the water right.

NARRATOR: The pipes carrying the water are corroding, leaching lead into the system and putting thousands of children in danger.

DR. MONA HANNA-ATTISHA (Hurley Children’s Hospital): Once a child has lead in their blood, there is not much that you can do about it.

MARC EDWARDS (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University): Even one swallow of that water would cause lead poisoning of a child, one swallow.

NARRATOR: How did this happen?

MARC EDWARDS: We were fighting the very agencies who were supposed to enforce the law.

NARRATOR: Can the people of Flint use science to fight back?

PROTESTOR: What do we want? Clean Water!

NARRATOR: Now, it’s a massive job to make Flint safe,…

GENERAL MICHAEL MCDANIEL (Flint FAST Start Program): There’s probably over 20,000 lead service lines in the city.

NARRATOR: …in Flint and around the country.

MARC EDWARDS: We’ve got millions of those lead pipes out there, might be in front of your house.

NARRATOR: Poisoned Water, right now, on NOVA.

FLINT GOVERNMENT OFFICALS: We need a countdown. Three, two, one, here’s to Flint!

NARRATOR: With the push of a button, the City of Flint, Michigan switches to a new source for its drinking water, the Flint River. That switch would soon become a disastrous combination of poisoned water and misuse of science.

GINA LUSTER: I remember the switch, because it was my daughter’s birthday. It was April 25th.

City and elected officials, a lot of them were saying, you know, “This is going to save us so much money,” and, “This is a good thing.” And we’re like, “Oh boy,” you know, holding our breath.

NARRATOR: There was nothing wrong with the city’s old water source, Lake Huron, so why make the switch at all? Mainly to save money.

CLAIRE MCCLINTON (Flint Resident): Flint is a blue collar, industrial city. We are the home of General Motors. We have experienced, like other cities and areas in the Rust Belt, a tremendous decline in jobs.

NARRATOR: Since the late 1950s, G.M. closed seven major facilities in the region. Tens of thousands of jobs were lost. In 2011, with the city close to bankruptcy, Governor Rick Snyder stripped power from city officials and assigned a series of emergency managers to fix Flint’s financial crisis.

DAYNE WALLING (Mayor of Flint, Michigan, 2009–2015): An emergency manager can come into a community, take the powers of a mayor and the city council and make decisions.

DARNELL EARLEY (Flint Emergency Manager, 2013–2015, film clip): We want to maintain access to a clean, sustainable water source.

NARRATOR: For decades, Flint purchased treated water, at a premium price, from Detroit. Now, the emergency manager and city officials pursue a plan to save millions by building a pipeline to Lake Huron. It would take years to finish.

Until then, the city would draw water from the Flint River and treat it at the old Flint Water Plant. There were problems from the very start.

FELIPE GATICA (Flint Resident): Rusty water came out, as soon as we turned it on. So, right then and there, you know, my wife being pregnant, she was like, “We’re not gonna use the water.”

CLAIRE MCCLINTON: My clothes in the washing machine are smelling like bleach, smelling like rotten eggs.

LISA GOULD-MALISZEWSKI (Flint Resident): We started to get rashes, listlessness, muscle aches and pains.

LEEANNE WALTERS: Where’s the other piggy at?

NARRATOR: LeeAnne Walters was a stay-at-home mom with 3-year-old twin boys and a teen-aged daughter.

LEEANNE WALTERS: My hairdresser was very concerned, because my hair was thinning out, pretty badly. And then we started noticing it in my daughter and in other…you know, my sons and my husband.

When we had our first bout of brown water, we didn’t understand what was happening. We were told by the city that they were winterizing the system, but we had lived here for years, at that point. We had never experienced anything like that.

GAVIN WALTERS (LeeAnne Walters’ Son): Am I hot?

LEEANNE WALTERS: You are hot.

NARRATOR: These problems led Walters to ask detailed questions about how the water was being treated.

LEEANNE WALTERS: I started requesting documents from the city. I wanted to know about the water treatment plant and how they were treating the water, what chemicals they were using, what their raw water data was before they treated the water.

NARRATOR: With no training in civil engineering, this was her own independent investigation. Her first question: how does water get treated?

As LeeAnne Walters discovers, at the time of the switch, local authorities set out to treat water from the Flint River much the way any other city would.

Nowhere is this better demonstrated than in Cincinnati, which has been treating river water for 200 years. In both Flint and Cincinnati, the water starts out essentially the same, straight from the river: brown and cloudy with particles.

JEFF SWERTFEGER (Greater Cincinnati Water Works): Now, you see the water is very cloudy and has all these particulates, things like clay, pieces of leaves, decaying sticks and things like that. But the particles are also things like bacteria. So, we want to make sure that we removes these particles in treatment.

NARRATOR: To remove the particles, both treatment plants use a coagulant that helps particles stick together. These bigger and heavier globs eventually sink to the bottom.

JEFF SWERTFEGER: We end up with a water that’s about like this. So, we actually remove about 90 to 95 percent of the solids in the water, just through that process.

NARRATOR: To remove additional solids and bacteria, the water moves through filtration beds, containing materials like sand. Flint’s beds are smaller than Cincinnati’s, but function much the same way.

JEFF SWERTFEGER: As the water trickles through the sand, then the sand will remove the rest of the particulates, the rest of the pathogens that could be left in the water. So then, when we, when we come out of the sand filters, that water looks very clear, very clean.

NARRATOR: The water might look clean, but coming from an industrialized river, it may still carry invisible toxins.

JEFF SWERTFEGER: There are chemical manufacturers all up and down the river, and some of that material can get into the water.

NARRATOR: To remove these, many cities use carbon filtration, similar to the charcoal in an aquarium or in a home water filter. At the end, finishing chemicals, like fluoride and chlorine, are added. As a rule, river water is more difficult to treat than lake water.

MICHAEL R. SCHOCK (Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development): River waters are just a big engineering challenge relative to a lake water source. Rainwater, snowmelt, run-off that goes into the river from agricultural sources…you can get road salts. River waters change very rapidly, and so, the entire treatment plant has to be geared to respond, within literally minutes, to hours of big changes in chemistry.

NARRATOR: Complex chemistry and a plant that hadn’t been fully operational in 50 years? Was Flint in over its head from the start?

Within a few months of the switch, not only are residents complaining of rashes and bad smells,…

NEWS AUDIO #1: Now, back in Flint, some folks are dealing with a new problem.

NARRATOR: …but the city is issuing public health warnings.

NEWS AUDIO #2: …bacteria that prompted a boil water advisory.

NEWS AUDIO #3: … needs to be boiled to kill of any bacteria.

NARRATOR: E. coli bacteria, a potentially dangerous pathogen that originates in fecal matter, is found in Flint’s water. To kill E. coli, Flint adds more and more chlorine. We use it for household cleaning and swimming pools, but over-chlorinated water can react with organic matter and create toxic byproducts. This starts to happen in Flint.

In October, another red flag.

NEWS AUDIO #4: Concerns over water quality in Flint are leading Genesee County’s biggest employer to shut off their taps.

NARRATOR: General Motors reports that Flint River water is corroding its engine parts.

WALTER SMITH-RANDOLPH (NBC Reporter, film clip): The issue here is the levels of chlorine in the water. It creates some sort of corrosion.

NARRATOR: G.M. switches back to Detroit water on its own. Meanwhile, city officials continue to insist the water is safe.

Ten months after the switch, the Walters family is facing worsening health problems.

LEEANNE WALTERS: We had taken the boys in for one of their check-ups. And for being almost four years old, they seemed abnormally small to me, for their age. And I was told, “Oh, this is normal. Twins are generally smaller.” My twins weren’t smaller. My twins were seven pounds, three weeks early, so to say that this was a normal twin thing didn’t sit right with me.

And the fact that every time Gavin would come in contact with the water, what it would do to his skin, and how badly he would break out…

The final straw was when they told us we had to start giving him Benadryl to take a bath. And then his skin would be so raw, and he’d be so broken out, and he would scream and cry so ungodly. We could not keep putting this child through what he was going through just to take a bath.

NARRATOR: LeeAnne isn’t the only one investigating Flint’s water. The city falls under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Protection Agency Region 5. The E.P.A. makes regulations to protect the environment, including the water supply.

Miguel Del Toral, a water regulation expert for E.P.A., has been following the events in Flint.

MIGUEL DEL TORAL (Environmental Protection Agency Region 5): I first started to get concerned when we just had a series of events that happened one after another. Beginning with the E. coli being found in the water, followed by high disinfection byproducts, and coupled with the severely discolored water, it was obvious to me that something was really wrong there.

NARRATOR: A key component of federal water regulation is the E.P.A.’s Lead and Copper Rule, which limits the amount of lead and copper allowed in drinking water before utilities must take action.

LEEANNE WALTERS: After, the city came in and started testing at my home and realized that I wasn’t a liar and that I wasn’t stupid and that the discolored water was happening almost on a daily basis in my home. And my first test came back at 104 parts per billion.

NARRATOR: One hundred and four parts per billion of lead.

LEEANNE WALTERS: The maximal allowed by E.P.A. is 15 parts per billion.

NARRATOR: Later, Leanne’s home will be called “ground zero,” known as the first critical case of dangerous lead levels in drinking water after the switch.

Walters contacts authorities in E.P.A. Region 5, who put her in touch with Del Toral.

MIGUEL DEL TORAL: I looked at the results from the Walters’ home. First result was 104 parts per billion, the second was 397 parts per billion, but it was looked at as an isolated problem.

NARRATOR: Del Toral and Walters are right to be concerned. Even the ancient Romans, who used lead for plumbing, knew it was toxic, though they didn’t understand why. Today, we do.

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the University of Cincinnati have been following children exposed to lead into adulthood. It’s the longest running study of its kind in the world.

DR. KIM CECIL (Cincinnati Lead Study): You nervous? A little bit?

NARRATOR: Dr. Kim Cecil is an investigator for the Cincinnati Lead Study.

DR. KIM CECIL: So, lead tricks the body into thinking it’s calcium. Whenever lead has got into your body, primarily through ingestion, it goes and hides where calcium should be, in the bones and in the cells of the brain.

Visualize a neuron. There’s the neuron that’s sending the signal and then another that’s receiving the signal, and, typically, calcium is in that gap.

NARRATOR: Calcium is essential for neurons to communicate, but when a child is exposed to lead, lead gets in that gap and blocks the flow of calcium. Without calcium, synapses get weaker and brain function suffers.

KIM CECIL: The average I.Q. of the Cincinnati lead study is 86. It should be 100 in a typically developing population.

NARRATOR: Lead can disrupt brain growth and even lead to shrinkage or volume loss in brain tissue.

KIM CECIL: I can give you, kind of, a hint of volume loss. You can see these ventricles look plump, because there’s less brain. From this analysis, I can tell you that most of that volume loss is in the frontal lobe. And that region of the brain is responsible for what makes us the most human. It controls our decision-making, our ability to pay attention, our ability to plan, to make judgment, to evaluate rewards, all the things that we need in life to be successful.

NARRATOR: Lead can cause harm wherever it ends up in the body, and lead poisoning can even be passed to the next generation.

KIM CECIL: If you’re a pregnant woman, exposed to lead when you were a child, that lead is stored in your bones. And when your body needs calcium for the developing fetus, it’s pulling lead out of the bone instead of calcium, in many cases.

NARRATOR: LeeAnne Walters’ drinking water has extremely high levels of lead, but where is it coming from?

Marc Edwards, a professor of environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, would play an important role in the story of Flint’s water.

MARC EDWARDS: Lead gets into drinking water almost exclusively from pipes. There are very few cases where there’s lead in water leaving the treatment plant.

NARRATOR: Edwards knows a lot can happen after the water leaves the treatment plant. In American cities, water flows through networks of underground pipes: first, through city water mains, up to 10 feet in diameter, typically made of iron. From the mains, smaller service lines carry water to individual homes and businesses. And, in Flint, a lot of those service lines are made of lead.

MARC EDWARDS: It used to be the law in some cities that that pipe had to be made of 100 percent pure lead. And so we’ve got millions of those lead pipes out there around the country, might be in front of your house.

NARRATOR: And it’s not just the service lines that can bring lead into your home.

MARC EDWARDS: After it goes into the house, oftentimes, in the basement, there’s three additional sources of lead in plumbing. One is lead in brass, which is the faucets and brass valves; galvanized iron had lead in it; and then you also had lead solder, which is a glue that’s used to connect metal pipes together. So, that’s how the water picks up lead, right before it comes out into your glass.

NARRATOR: If there is so much lead in our plumbing, why aren’t we all lead-poisoned? The answer lies in the complex chemical reactions that go on between the pipe itself and the water flowing through it.

MIKE SCHOCK: Inside the pipe, as the water goes through, it reacts. Chemical reactions take place with the plumbing material, and this begins to build up kind of a protective coating, what we call a “scale.”

NARRATOR: This protective scale is crucial. It becomes a barrier that prevents lead from leaching into the water.

As scientists at the E.P.A.’s office of research and development reveal, this protective scale can be made of up to 90 percent lead.

MIKE SCHOCK: Most people don’t expect that there’s actually a lot of lead in the scale. It’s not a very good joke, but we often say that you are drinking water through lead painted straws, because these are the minerals that were in lead paint, and yet they’re lining your drinking water pipe.

You’re using lead to protect yourself from lead.

NARRATOR: To control pipe corrosion, water utilities often add a chemical that helps build up the scale and protect the water. This is so critical, that E.P.A.’s Lead and Copper Rule requires cities with over 50,000 people to have what’s called “corrosion control treatment” in place.

The question is has the City of Flint been using corrosion control?

LEEANNE WALTERS: I had requested, from the City of Flint, one of their monthly operational reports. And I was going through that, and I was looking at what chemicals they were using in our water. And I wasn’t seeing anything they were using for an anti-corrosion.

NARRATOR: An anxious Walters reaches out to Miguel Del Toral.

LEEANNE WALTERS: And so I had called Miguel, and I told him I wasn’t seeing orthophosphates, anything that should say, “Hey, there’s a corrosion control in here.” And so he asked me to read him the document, and I did. He asked me to read it to him again. We went through this three or four times.

And so he’s like, “Nope, that doesn’t sound right. You need to, can you please send that to me?” And so I emailed it to him. And then he called me back, and then he said, “Oh, my god, they’re breaking a federal law. They’re not using any corrosion controls.”

NARRATOR: On his own, Del Toral had already contacted M.D.E.Q., the Michigan environmental agency, to see if Flint had implemented corrosion control.

MIGUEL DEL TORAL: Early on, we received an email from the D.E.Q. that, basically, indicated that the system had corrosion control in place.

NARRATOR: After Walter’s discovery, Del Toral emailed M.D.E.Q. to ask again about corrosion control.

MIGUEL DEL TORAL: The city, at that point, told us that the system did not have corrosion control in place.

I thought that was pretty incredible, that they would not. The public health implications of not having corrosion control and having lead lines in the system, was, was really weighing on me, at that point.

MIKE SCHOCK: If you don’t add the corrosion inhibitor when you should have it, the result’s going to be, you’ll have much higher lead levels or copper levels or what your other metals are in that distribution system.

NARRATOR: The power of corrosion control can be seen with the naked eye. At Virginia Tech, Amy Pruden compares Flint’s water to water from the Detroit system. She places a small iron coil, to represent the iron water mains, into each sample.

AMY PRUDEN (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University): In this case, we’re going to go ahead and let this water react overnight. And what we’ll see is that, with time, the more corrosive Flint water will react with the iron.

NARRATOR: With no corrosion control in place, the Flint water corrodes and rusts the iron much faster.

AMY PRUDEN: And we’ll also see the water begin to become orange and cloudy, because of the rust.

NARRATOR: The corrosive water not only rusted Flint’s iron water mains, but it also attacked the scale on the lead lines servicing individual homes.

MIKE SCHOCK: So now, because this water was much more corrosive, the scale changed, it saw a different chemical environment, and the scale began to flake off and deteriorate from all types of plumbing, including the lead. And then the lead on that surface of the pipe dissolved rapidly into the water.

NARRATOR: Over several months, protests had been building.

LEEANNE WALTERS: We were watching people hold up bags of hair, and we were experiencing hair loss; people showing off their rashes, we had rashes. They were holding up jugs of water that looked, not as bad as this one, but discolored.

So, at that point, we realized it wasn’t just our home. It wasn’t specific to us. And knowing that there’s something happening to my children, and that my children were being harmed…you can mess with me all you want, but don’t mess with my kids.

It wasn’t just about my kids, though, it was everybody’s kids. You’re hurting all the kids in my neighborhood that I love. All the kids that live in the City of Flint. And so, that wasn’t okay with me.

NARRATOR: Fourteen months after the switch, Miguel Del Toral’s emails reveal frustration at what he sees as his own agency’s unwillingness to take charge of the growing crisis. He does something that catches E.P.A. Region 5 leadership by surprise: he writes a preliminary report on the situation in Flint, sharing it with LeeAnne Walters, who gives it to the press.

MARC EDWARDS: The memo laid out the danger to Flint’s residents and children, that they were not being protected by Federal Corrosion Control laws. There was one child who’d been lead poisoned, and in all likelihood, there were many others.

NARRATOR: But the memo fails to inspire the kind of action Flint residents are looking for.

BRAD WURFEL (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Spokesperson, audio clip): Anyone who’s concerned about lead in the drinking water in Flint can relax.

NARRATOR: E.P.A. Region 5 director Susan Hedman apologizes to Flint’s mayor for its release.

MARC EDWARDS: Then the mayor of Flint went on T.V., drinking the water, telling everyone in Flint the water was safe to drink.

NARRATOR: Later, according to N.P.R., a spokesperson for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, M.D.E.Q., will describe Del Toral as a “rogue employee,” and, according to LeeAnne Walters, another M.D.E.Q. official discredits his report.

LEEANNE WALTERS: Liane Shekter-Smith, head of drinking water for M.D.E.Q., told me that Miguel had been handled, that his report was flawed, and there would be no final report.

NARRATOR: By now, Walters’ son Gavin has been diagnosed with lead poisoning.

LEEANNE WALTERS: Well, I had called Marc in tears. I was just bawling my eyes out, and I’m like, “What do we do? How do we stop this? We just can’t sit by and let all these kids be poisoned. It’s too late for my family. What about everybody else’s kids?

NARRATOR: Edwards was already working with Walters to measure the level of lead in her water.

MARC EDWARDS: I’ll never forget calling her on the phone and telling her how to fill up 30 bottles. And so, she was at this sink here, filling up the bottles, and she Federal Expressed the samples back to us. And it took us a few days to analyze them, and when I got those results, it was about midnight. I was in my easy chair, and I almost, I almost fell out of it, and my heart skipped a couple of beats, because it, it was the worst lead and water contamination I’d seen in 25 years.

NARRATOR: Virginia Tech researcher Jeffrey Parks evaluates the water samples from the Walters’ home.

JEFFREY PARKS (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University): What we found was that there was a lot of lead everywhere, for the most part. The first sample was over 2,000. And as we flip to sample 20, which is 20 liters of water being flushed through her kitchen sink, that sample read 13,200 parts per billion of lead.

Five thousand is considered hazardous waste, so we’re almost three times the level of hazardous waste in that one sample.

NARRATOR: Poisoned water, poisoned science, government inaction, lives of children and families under threat, to Marc Edwards, the story unfolding in Flint is all too familiar.

MARC EDWARDS: I knew something like Flint was inevitable, based on 10 years’ prior experience in Washington D.C.

NEWS AUDIO #5: For the residents of the Nation’s Capital tonight, there is a concern over a potential danger at home.

MARC EDWARDS: From 2001 to 2010, they suffered the worst lead contamination event in modern U.S. history.

NARRATOR: The water crisis in the Nation’s Capital started in the early 2000s, when the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority, WASA, and the Army Corps of Engineers made a water treatment switch. And, like Flint, they failed to add corrosion control chemicals to the water.

CAROL SCHWARTZ (D.C. City Councilor, audio file): WASA apparently has uncovered…elevated levels of lead in D.C. tap water and apparently has been aware, for some time, that the problem could be widespread.

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON (United States House of Representatives, film clip): We want to know what actually happened.

MARC EDWARDS: Congress was mad because lead was high. People were marching in the streets. They were out of their mind with anger.

NARRATOR: D.C. residents had been drinking lead-contaminated water for almost three years before the public was notified.

Elin Betanzo was a water engineer at the E.P.A.

ELIN BETANZO (Northeast-Midwest Institute): Even though we have a drinking water regulation that directly addresses lead in drinking water, the Lead and Copper Rule, my boss asked me, “Do you think people were actually hurt here? We need to find out if children get poisoned by lead through drinking water.”

NARRATOR: Betanzo began her research but never completed it.

ELIN BETANZO: I was given a leadership role on a different project, but sometimes, when I look back on it, I wonder if I was moved because I was asking too many questions about what was happening in Washington, D.C.

NARRATOR: Then, in 2004, the Centers for Disease Control reported that children in D.C. who had been drinking the contaminated water did not have high enough levels of lead in their blood to cause concern.

MARC EDWARDS: The claim was that kids could drink any amount a lead in water and it wouldn’t hurt them. And that story spread nationally, internationally, did all kinds of harm to kids. That’s the danger of bad science.

NARRATOR: Edwards challenged the C.D.C.’s findings, and over the next six years, spent thousands of dollars of his own funds and demanded scores of documents under the Freedom of Information Act.

MARC EDWARDS: It’s not so much the initial crime, it’s when people read these papers and believe it, act on it. And then you had cheating all around the country, because it didn’t matter how much lead in water your kid drank.

NARRATOR: Edwards discovered that thousands of blood test results had been lost. And many of the individuals tested were already drinking filtered or bottled water. A congressional investigation agreed: there were grave problems with the scientific integrity of the study.

ELIN BETANZO: I was just horrified that, you know, finally, there is confirmation that everything that had been shared between 2004 and 2010 was wrong. And part of me felt like I should’ve been able to see that and intervene.

NARRATOR: Marc Edwards estimated that more than 40,000 children under the age of two or in the womb were potentially exposed to high levels of lead in the water. Many could be left with lifelong problems.

The experience had a huge impact on him.

MARC EDWARDS: You’re questioning these agencies. And to see them attack you, and to see your friends leave you and your career destroyed, but the public welfare depends on you getting the truth out.

NARRATOR: Over a decade after the D.C. crisis, Siddartha Roy, a Ph.D. student of Edwards’, knows how affected he was by the ordeal.

SID ROY: It radicalized him. So, that, kind of, gave him a playbook, a set of tools that we were ready to deploy in case another D.C. happened.

NARRATOR: To Edwards, Flint is the next D.C.

MARC EDWARDS: All the science was done, essentially, before I got involved.

LeeAnne was the one who figured out that her children had been poisoned by the water. LeeAnne figured out, on her own, that the state actually had said that corrosion control was in place when it wasn’t there. And Miguel had checked into it and found out it was all true.

MARC EDWARDS: We were mainly involved in figuring out just how bad the problem was getting.

NARRATOR: Edwards hopes a citywide investigation of Flint’s water will force government agencies to finally take action. And for that, his playbook calls for willing bodies.

MARC EDWARDS: We needed a team of students to immediately go to Flint and start sampling the water.

SID ROY: So, the key to getting students to do their job is to feed them free pizza.

MARC EDWARDS: I sent out an email, requesting volunteers, and I used the bribe of free pizza. And I explained the situation: that I felt this entire city’s future was in danger.

SID ROY: He was going to launch a volunteer effort, and he asked if people were willing to volunteer, so we said yes.

MARC EDWARDS: It was us or nobody. This was a war.

NARRATOR: Marc and his students drive 550 miles from Blacksburg, Virginia, to Flint, to test the water and distribute sampling kits. Flint residents will have to follow a rigorous scientific protocol for the results to be valid.

MARC EDWARDS: What are you up to, 80? Okay, well only 200 more to go.

SID ROY: We wanted to make sure every resident gets how to actually sample their homes.

LEEANNE WALTERS: I made sure that there were 45 participants in each zip code, so we made this a statistical test, so we could prove that this was a citywide problem, not specific to one home or one zip code. We were given 300 kits.

I’m here for your water kit.

And within those 300 kits, we returned 277 kits in three weeks.

You have a great day.

Citizens testing their own water to prove that there’s a problem…no one’s ever done anything like that before.

SID ROY: The people of Flint really were desperate for answers.

GINA LUSTER: We were so sick. I mean, like, missing numerous days of work and school. And we did not know what the heck was wrong with us. I mean, just, severe fatigue and diarrhea and rashes and losing teeth and hair. And we were going to doctors and no one had an answer.

PROTESTER: I had to go in and pay a $512 water bill, for water that is making my family sick!

SID ROY: They had been protesting this water quality, and they were not getting anywhere. The city insisted everything was fine.

NARRATOR: By early September 2015, 17 months after the switch, this experiment in citizen science is yielding results. Hundreds of samples are collected by residents.

When analyzed by Virginia Tech, many show high lead levels, some six times higher than the Lead and Copper Rule allows.

Students begin calling homes with the highest lead levels, to warn residents not to use tap water without a filter.

An effective filter can remove up to 99 percent of lead and other metals.

SID ROY: I called up this woman who had very high lead and she asks us, “So how much does a filter cost?” And we’re like, “It’s $25.” And she goes, “Well, I’m on social welfare. There’s no way I can afford $25 in the next two months.” I’ve never felt so helpless in my life.

MICHAEL MOORE (filmmaker protesting, film clip): Let’s call this what it is. It’s not just a water crisis, it’s a racial crisis, it’s a poverty crisis.

PROTESTORS: Water is a human right. Fight, fight, fight!

MARC EDWARDS: We realized early on that we had to be investigative scientists.

NARRATOR: Edwards has another rule in his playbook: get hold of internal government documents to see what’s happening behind the scenes.

MARC EDWARDS: We knew what documents to ask for. We and we alone knew where the bodies were going to be buried.

SID ROY: Unknown to all of us, Marc was filing Freedom of Information Act requests left and right.

NARRATOR: On September 15, 2015, Virginia Tech researchers publically present their findings: Flint’s water has dangerously high levels of lead.

MARC EDWARDS (film clip): We estimate that the water in about 5,000 Flint homes is over standards set by the World Health Organization for lead in water.

LEEANNE WALTERS (film clip): This evidence shows that Flint is not monitoring according to the Lead and Copper Rules given by the E.P.A. Basically, the bottom line is stop trying to come up with ways to hide the lead. You should be looking for the high lead; that is your job as the D.E.Q.

SID ROY: We left a very clear message that no matter what the state says, no matter what the city says, the science is clear on this, and no one should be drinking that water.

NARRATOR: But Michigan authorities, at M.D.E.Q., dispute Virginia Tech’s findings.

SID ROY: M.D.E.Q., says that the V.T research group led by Marc Edwards, they essentially can go to any city and they’ll find lead. Essentially, they pull the lead rabbit out of the hat.

MARC EDWARDS: Why is it that normal people sampling their water are finding all this lead, when the city and state, who are being paid to do this and determine if the water is safe, can’t seem to find any lead?

NARRATOR: The answer would be found in the emails and documents streaming in from Freedom of Information Act requests.

When the Virginia Tech team and other investigators scour the documents, they uncover disturbing problems with the state’s testing protocols.

MARC EDWARDS: And so, when it came to Flint, they used every trick in the book. They used pre-cleaning of pipes the night before sampling. They told consumers to clean out their lines for five minutes.

MIGUEL DEL TORAL: By including an instruction for residents to pre-flush the tap before they collect compliance samples, what that, in effect, does is results in less lead being captured than is actually there. And so it makes the public water system look like they have low lead levels, when in fact they may not.

MARC EDWARDS: On top of that, incredibly, they had samples from LeeAnne Walter’s house. All those samples were thrown into the garbage. They said that LeeAnne’s house was not an approved sampling site, and, therefore, they weren’t going to count any of those samples.

SID ROY: And I’m in shock again. I’m witnessing engineers trying to artificially reduce the actual numbers by manipulating where you sample.

NARRATOR: But a week later, new evidence emerges that authorities cannot ignore. It begins with water engineer Elin Betanzo, who’d been at the E.P.A. during the D.C. crisis. By coincidence, she is now working in southeast Michigan and reading about the crisis in Flint.

ELIN BETANZO: I had seen a news report where there is a memo written by Miguel Del Toral from the E.P.A. Region 5 office, and I used to work with Miguel. I have so much respect for Miguel. And so, when I saw his name on this memo, and I read it and I understood it, I was scared. I was scared for the people of Flint.

So, I thought back to Washington, D.C., and I thought about what happened there and I was thinking, “I know what’s happening here. What can I do?”

NARRATOR: A few weeks later, Betanzo is at dinner with her friend Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician with access to crucial blood data at Flint’s Hurley Children’s Hospital.

ELIN BETANZO: So then, like, my brain is spinning, and I said “Do you have access to all the medical records at your hospital? You’ve got to do a study. You’ve got to look to see if lead levels in children’s blood has increased, from before they switched the water.”

She got started on her study the next day.

MONA HANNA-ATTISHA: That night was the first night that I stopped sleeping, because anybody who knows anything about lead stops sleeping. And that really, kind of, started my, almost, crusade to find out if that lead in the water was getting into the bodies of our children.

This is not something you mess around with. We are never ever, ever supposed to expose a child to lead, because once a child has it in their blood, there is not much that you can do about it.

NARRATOR: Dr. Hanna-Attisha begins a systematic study of the amounts of lead in children’s blood.

PHLEBOTOMIST (Hurley Children’s Hospital): How old are you? You are doing real good.

MONA HANNA-ATTISHA: What we did is we compared lead levels before the water switch in 2013, and we compared them to lead levels after the water switch in 2015. We were really only looking at one thing: was the percentage of children with lead levels at or above five micrograms per deciliter.

When we saw the results we weren’t surprised, but we were heartbroken. How could this have happened?

We saw that the percentage of children with elevated lead levels—this, this five or greater—had doubled after the water switch. And in some neighborhoods, where, where the water lead levels done by Marc Edwards were the highest, were the same neighborhoods that the children’s blood lead levels had increased the most.

But right away, the, the state’s machinery began to dismiss me. They began to dismiss the research, and that the state’s number didn’t add up to my numbers. They said that I was causing near-hysteria.

I shouldn’t have been surprised, because for 18 months, the people of Flint were dismissed. And the moms were dismissed, and the activists were dismissed, and the pastors, and the journalists and the E.P.A. scientists were dismissed.

NARRATOR: But a week later, Dr. Eden Wells, Chief Medical Executive at Michigan’s Department of Health, concludes the research is sound. She is pivotal in convincing other agencies of the importance of this study.

DR. EDEN WELLS (Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, film clip): Do we know how many children will actually have a long-term effect from this exposure? We do not.

PROTESTERS: What do we want? Clean water! When do we want it ? Now!

PROTESTER: There are babies that are sick that will have to deal with illnesses for the rest of their life. You have people that are in hospitals for multiple months, while our politicians are sitting back playing politics.

NARRATOR: And lead is not the only danger in Flint’s waters.

NEWS AUDIO #6: … a deadly spike in something called Legionnaires’ disease.

NARRATOR: During the crisis, Flint suffers one of the largest outbreaks in U.S. history of Legionnaires’ disease.

NEWS AUDIO #7: State health officials say the number of deaths from Legionnaire’s disease in the Flint area has now grown.

NARRATOR: One of the deadliest water-borne illnesses in the developed world, it’s a severe form of pneumonia caused by legionella bacteria. Experts suspect that the legionella outbreak was triggered by Flint’s water treatment.

AMY PRUDEN: To our knowledge, what happened in Flint is really the first example of where lack of corrosion control can trigger a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak.

NARRATOR: According to Amy Pruden and Marc Edwards, chlorine added to Flint’s water should have killed off legionella, but without corrosion control, Flint’s water filled up with rusty iron. Chlorine reacted with rust and was used up, and with no chlorine to stop it, legionella thrived inside Flint’s water pipes. Ninety people were infected; 12 of them died.

In October 2015, 18 months after the switch, Flint finally changes back to the Detroit water system and once again receives properly treated water from Lake Huron. But it will take many months for Flint’s water pipes to rebuild the protective scale that’s been stripped away.

The Virginia Tech study concludes that over 40 percent of Flint homes had elevated levels of lead in their water, and as many as 8,000 children under the age of six were exposed.

DAYNE WALLING: A rise in the number of children with elevated blood lead levels was devastating for our community.

NARRATOR: Crucial evidence from Freedom of Information Act filings by Marc Edwards, the A.C.L.U. and others reveals the failure of Michigan’s water and health officials to protect the public.

Thirteen criminal indictments follow, including emergency managers, and officials from Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality, Department of Health and Human Services and the Flint Water Plant.

BILL SCHUETTE (Michigan Attorney General, film clip): Flint was a casualty of arrogance, absence of accountability, shirking responsibility.

NARRATOR: Charges included tampering with evidence, conspiracy and willful neglect of duty.

Susan Hedman, head of E.P.A. Region 5, resigns under criticism.

DAYNE WALLING: One of the emails, from the E.P.A. said, “Is Flint the kind of community we should go to bat for?” And you know, I just felt sick to my stomach to think that my family, my neighborhood, my city somehow counts less?

COURT OFFICER AT A HEARING: … the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

DAYNE WALLING: And then later, the state Department of Environmental Quality admits that they had misinterpreted the Lead and Copper Rule, that the orthophosphate should’ve been ordered from the beginning.

KEITH CREAGH (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, news clip): Corrosion treatment should’ve been required by the Department of Environmental Quality.

DAYNE WALLING: That’s not how government’s supposed to work. It’s not how science is supposed to work.

NARRATOR: Mayor Dayne Walling, who drank the water on T.V. during the crisis, is voted out of office.

Over a year and a half after the switch, officials declare a state of emergency. So far, federal and state agencies have provided over 300-million dollars to help the city, but some estimate that as much as a billion-and-a-half dollars will be needed to upgrade the water system and provide services for families and children affected by the crisis.

For now, bottled water is a way of life.

CHERKEETHA LOVE (Flint Water Response Team): We’re passing out water for the residents of Flint, for us. We all need the water, because we have lead and different things going on with our water.

LEEANNE WALTERS: I tell people if they don’t believe Flint is that bad, “Turn off the water to your house—go in your basement or wherever your shutoff is, turn it off for the entire week—and, and see how it is to live.” My children will never drink the water from a tap ever again. My family will never, ever, ever trust a water source again, just because we’re told to.

GINA LUSTER: I mean, the amount of water bottles just my small family goes through would shock the average person. Easily, you can go through a case of water just with one dinner.

We didn’t think we would be living years like that. We thought this would be over.

When they did that switch, they did it for financial …?

VEO LUSTER (Water Distribution Specialist): Yeah, it was financial.

NARRATOR: Gina Lusters’ father is a water distribution specialist helping to replace pipes in Flint.

VEO LUSTER: Two of the grandchildren had exceedingly high levels. The youngest one is just, what, eight now, so she’s been drinking it, you know, she don’t know any other water system, you know?

NARRATOR: Flint is now working to replace about 20,000 service lines, but how many more Flints are out there? A report estimates that over 18-million Americans were served by water systems in violation of the Lead and Copper Rule in 2015.

MICHAEL MCDANIEL: This is going to happen over and over again. We’re seeing it here. We’re going to see it across the rest of the country. Any older industrial city where you’ve got older service lines and older mains that have been there for 80, 90 years. If we aren’t replacing those on a regular basis, we’re going to have the same problems here.

MIKE SCHOCK: It’s going to take time. There are literally millions of pipes. We don’t know how many lead pipes there are, but it’s many millions. And this is going to take decades and decades to do.

The interim solution is we need stringent corrosion control and very proactive monitoring.

NARRATOR: Some of the same agencies criticized during the crisis, are now supporting the work to heal Flint.

MARC EDWARDS: I saw how hard E.P.A. and M.D.E.Q. have worked to help get Flint fixed since January of 2016. It’s been amazing.

NARRATOR: Today Marc Edwards and local authorities agree that the water in Flint is safe to drink with a filter.

VEO LUSTER: I get emotional when I think about the kids, and…excuse me for a minute.

But, you know, as a licensed water professional in the State of Michigan, you see, you read about, you hear about, you talk about the long-term effects of the bacteria, the heavy metals, the lead, you know what it can do. And you just hope, by the grace of god, that the people are okay.

MIGUEL DEL TORAL: From the standpoint of science, once you start to corrupt the science, the validity of the results that you’re trying to present get called into question. If you corrupt the science, in a sense, you corrupt your agency. And once the public loses trust, it’s going to be very difficult to try to regain that trust. And it may take a long time.

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You all are being conned into diverting your attention away from the greatest threat to life. The greatest threat to our planet is the building of this ruling class capitalist munitions branch.
 
So many fixate on the Pentagon and political puppets but few examine the powerful capitalists who control it. They’ve been consolidating their power, if you have not noticed. Few bother studying them and the markets they profit from by robbing the working class blind and destroying them every step of the way. As long as the working class ignore who is truly running this nation and expose their crimes, nothing will ever change.
 
“DuPont chemical company, which until recently operated a site in Parkersburg that is more than 35 times the size of the Pentagon” – The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare
 
Dow Chemical and DuPont Have Completed a $130 Billion Merger.
 
“Nuclear weapons contractors repeatedly stifle whistleblowers, auditors say. The Energy Department lets its private contractors police themselves, producing “chilled work environments” in which employees who find wrongdoing have no useful path for complaints”
 
Dow Chemical and General Electric have yet been held financially accountable for damages to communities or cleaned up the superfund sites they created from the last arms race. Dow Chemical and General Electric are two of those concealed institutions that our government serves with clearly no oversight and none on the horizon.
 
 
And since our Trillion dollar weapons upgrade is being created under these current conditions, I’m sure this time we are far more likely to nuke ourselves in the process of this “upgrade.”
 
“Drawing on recently declassified documents and interviews with people who designed and routinely handled nuclear weapons, Command and Control takes readers into a terrifying but fascinating world that, until now, has been largely hidden from view. Through the details of a single accident, Schlosser illustrates how an unlikely event can become unavoidable, how small risks can have terrible consequences, and how the most brilliant minds in the nation can only provide us with an illusion of control. Audacious, gripping, and unforgettable, Command and Control is a tour de force of investigative journalism, an eye-opening look at the dangers of America’s nuclear age.”
 
When will we ever learn that putting power in the hands of those only interested in greed will destroy us all and think nothing of it.
 
 
Why?
 
“The United States must remain at the frontier of nuclear technology, even while it negotiates about restraint in its use. From the perspective of the past century’s absence of a major power conflict, it could be argued that nuclear weapons have made the world less prone to war.” – World Order by Kissinger (page 340 – 341.) & Hillary agreed because Kissinger is the policy voice of the Deep State. “Henry Kissinger’s book makes a compelling case for why we have to do it and how we can succeed.” – Hillary Clinton.
 
American psychos….
 
The United States is currently appropriating $1 Trillion dollars over the next 30 years to upgrade our nuclear weapons program because that’s apparently a high priority for us here in the states…. or should I say Dow Chemical, DuPont, General Electric, and company need a huge subsidy infusion of billions of dollars. I wonder why? Could it possibly be because some of their current investments are in trouble because consumers realize their products are actually destroying them?
 
 
The other 9/11 you’ve never heard about…
 
“Department of Energy officials deny this, but it’s likely that a criticality — a nuclear chain reaction — occurred during the 1957 fire…. Elements such as strontium-90 and cesium-135 never occur except in the case of a nuclear chain reaction. Based on soil and water testing completed decades later that detected the presence of these elements, some experts — despite the government’s insistence that there has never been a criticality at Rocky Flats — believe that a criticality accident producing various fission products may have occurred on September 11, 1957.
 
But the worst thing about the fire was that no one — except for officials with the Department of Energy and Rocky Flats (then operated by Dow Chemical) — knew about it. There was no public evacuation, no warning, nothing in the press. Local citizens had no idea. This fire was deliberately hidden from public view. People were exposed to plutonium and other contaminants without their knowledge, although officials at the plant were aware of what was going on.
 
COHEN: How long did it take for the government, and the private entities involved, to admit to what happened on September 11, 1957? When did it dawn on people, in the area and elsewhere, that this great event had occurred?
 
IVERSEN: Thirteen years passed before the public began to learn that this fire occurred and had contaminated the Denver metro area — and it took another devastating fire to force the government and the private companies that operated Rocky Flats to reveal the truth….
 
“For some, the story of Rocky Flats, one of the most disgraceful episodes in the annals of America’s interaction with the atom, is ancient history. For others, it’s a current event. For Kristen Iversen, it’s a burden she lives with, physically and psychologically, every day of her life. Iversen is the author of a new book on the subject — Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a striking tale of innocence in a time and a place of great danger. It’s the story of an American family buying into the myth of nuclear safety, a story of an abuse of trust for which our government still hasn’t fully atoned.”
 
Nuclear Energy feeds into all fluoride-based capitalist markets.
 
The Fluoride Deception: How a Nuclear Waste Byproduct Made Its Way Into the Nation’s Drinking Water – A new book, titled “The Fluoride Deception” by Christopher Bryson examines the background of the fluoridation debate. According to Bryson, research challenging fluoride’s safety was either suppressed or not conducted in the first place. He says fluoridation is a triumph not of medical science but of US government spin.
 
* Christopher Bryson, has reported science news stories for many media outlets including the BBC, Christian Science Monitor and the Discovery Channel. He was part of an investigative team at Public Television that won a George Polk Award for “The Kwitny Report.”
 
“Sodium fluoride is used as a rat poison for a long time.”
…In essence, the uranium and fluoride that was necessary for enriching of the uranium and produced this by-product and obviously this waste of fluoride in my mind it sounds very similar to the issue of depleted uranium , again, being a by-product of the nuclear industry and the need then to sanitize these waste products from our nuclear industry, for the public to get rid of them in other words , right? So, it’s—could you talk a little bit about the role of Edward Bernays, ,the father of propaganda or public relations in America in convincing the public about this?
 
CHRISTOPHER BRYSON: Yes, the Manhattan Project with the World War II, very secret project to make the atomic bomb. I went to industry archives, a very large, significant industry archive out at the University of Cincinnati and found that the very same health researcher , Dr. Robert Kehoe who headed up the laboratory at the University Of Cincinnati, he spent his entire career telling the United States’ public health community that adding lead to gasoline was safe. That’s now being discredited. He was also one of two leading public health scientists saying that adding fluoride to water was safe and good for children. So, that’s the—some of the material that this book gets into.”
 
 
Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCS) The Devil We Know
Chasing Molecules excerpt explaining the ethylene tree branch of perfluorinated compounds. It’s our whole economic model that needs to be re-designed. Munition technologies have evolved significantly.
 
(Always remember that DuPont’s nickname was “The Merchants of Death” in the early 1900s for a reason)
 
Chapter 7: Out of the Frying Pan
Excerpt on Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs)
 
“This scenario of new materials with comparable intrinsic hazards being offered as alternatives to restricted products is now being repeated with perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). This is a family of compounds from an alphabet soup of names that are used to create non-stick, stain-repellant, and waterproof surfaces and films for both industrial and consumer applications—compounds so widely used that the EPA describes human exposure to these chemicals as “ubiquitous.” Perfluorinated compounds also provide an illustration of how difficult it is under our current chemical regulatory system to find out what is in a commercially marketed synthetic chemical even when it’s being used in contact with food or in products that touch our bodies. They also clearly demonstrate why it’s so important to ask questions about new materials’ biochemical behavior, molecular structure, and behavior—and not simply about performance and expedient production—as they’re being designed for a pharmaceutical or a frying pan.
 
Among this class of synthetic chemicals that we’ve been wrapping around food, sitting on, and wearing are substances that have been linked to impaired liver and thyroid function, immune and reproductive system problems, altered production of genetic proteins involved in cellular development, to tumor production in lab animals, and to elevated cholesterol levels in children, as well as to changes in metabolism, including how the body processes fat. These compounds are endocrine-disrupting properties and have been linked to cancer.
 
These perfluorinated chemicals—also sometimes referred to as perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) or fluoropolymers—are physically long chain molecules, made up predominantly of carbons and fluorines, in which the carbons are surrounded by fluorine atoms. (In chemistry, the prefix “per” describes a molecule that has the maximum amount of a particular element for its configuration. In the case of PFCs, each molecule has as many fluorine atoms attached as that structure can support.) Their varying lengths and structures depend on how, by whom, and for what purpose they are manufactured. This combination of elements makes strong, flexible, liquid-resistant, and slick-surfaced polymers. They are used as photoresist compounds in semiconductor manufacture, as fire-fighting foams, as insulation in plastics that sheathe wires and cables, as grease-resistant coating on pizza boxes, takeout food containers, microwave popcorn bags, and other packaging, including the support cards in candy and bakery items. They’re also used to make carpets, upholstery, and clothing fabrics (including leather) stain- and water-resistant—and are even added to toilet cleaner.
 
Among these compounds is one known as perfluorooctane sulfonate (FPOS). PFOA—made with eight carbon atoms and sometimes referred to as C8—is an ingredient of yet another per fluorinated compound called polytetrafluoroethylene (PFTE) that made up the original formulation of the products sold under the names Teflon, Gore-Tex, and Scotchguard. The structure that makes PFOA, PFOS, and PFTE so strong and durable also means that they resist degradation in the environment. They do so to such an extent that, like other persistent pollutants, they are chemical globetrotters. They are being found in Arctic animals, both fish and mammals—including polar bears—as well as in ice and snow. They’ve been found in Lake Ontario trout, in bird eggs collected along the Baltic Sea, in plant tissue, in mink liver, and in threatened and endangered sea turtles along the southern coast of the United States, including the Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle, now the scarcest of loggerhead sea turtles. Levels of PFOA and PFOS measured in sea otters along California coast reported in 2006 were the highest yet found in sea mammals.
 
While these fluoropolymers and the smaller molecules into which they break down are being found in remote locations and far from where their products were used or made, they are also being detected in human bio monitoring studies all around the world. Testing by the 3M Company—until 2000, itself a major PFOA producer—found PFCs in 95 precent of the Americans it surveyed, while researchers from the Center for Disease Control found such compounds in 98 percent of the Americans it tested. These compounds have even been found in fetal cord blood of newborn babies. These babies, part of a study conducted in Baltimore, Maryland, were also predominately low-birth-weight babies, suggesting that there may be a connection between PFC exposure and prenatal development. Subsequent studies found similar incidence of low birth weights in babies born to mothers in Denmark carrying PFOA in their blood. As has been observed in some PBDE studies, PFC levels in children taken from biomonitoring studies appeared to be higher that those in adults in the same studies. Given that PFOA can last years and that reexposure is almost certain under current conditions, it’s not surprising that children have been found to carry proportionally higher loads of these chemicals than do adults.
 
There are so many of these compounds at large in the environment and PFCs last so long that PFOA has now been detected in deep ocean environments in the Labrador Sea, which occupies a critical location in global ocean circulation and could send contaminants into either European or North American Arctic, thus extending their routes of potential exposure to people and wildlife. Factor in subsistence global warming in the far north and it’s likely these contaminants’ potential impacts will be felt more directly than in more southerly locations….
 
In late 2008, PFOA and PFOS were found in sewage sludge used as fertilizer on agricultural fields used for cattle grazing near Decatur, Alabama, where there was fear that the meat itself might be contaminated. The chemicals are thought to have originated in wastewater from nearby chemical manufacturing plants. Similar cases of PFC contamination of waterways and sludge have been reported across the United States and elsewhere around the world.
 
Meanwhile, workers at plants that produce PFCs have routinely been testing positive for these compounds. Such discoveries date back to 1978. Testing of DuPont workers done throughout the 1980s and the 1990s found elevated blood levels of PFOA and employees at DuPont’s West Virginia plant were found—in company studies—also to have higher than normal rates of leukemia, heart problems, atherosclerosis, and aneurysms. Women at a 3M plant who’d worked with these chemicals reported instances of birth defects in their children in the early 1980s, and in 1997 traces of PFOA and PFOS were reported in donated blood supplies…
 
There turn out to be a number of nonstick cookware lines now being sold under the banner of “PFOA-free.”…. There are a number of these PTFE-based “PFOA-free” products now being made by DuPont and other PFC manufacturers.
 
How, I wondered, could a material be “PFOA-free” yet made with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFR)? For an explanation, I spoke to Olga Nadeinko, a senior scientist with the Environmental Working Group. These compounds are big, Christmas tree-like polymers, she says, explaining that “the carbon backbone of the molecule is the trunk of the tree and the side chains with the fluorine atoms are the branches.” PFOA is also known as C8 because it has eight carbon atoms from which its fluorine branches stem. One of the new perfluorinated compounds being used as an alternative to PFOA or C8, she explains is a compound known as perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA)—or C6, so named for the six carbon atoms in the molecules that make up the backbone or tree trunk of this PFC.
 
“What happens,” Nadeinko continued, “is that eventually the branches break off the tree” and these branches that form six-, seven-, and eight-carbon-chain molecules are among the perfluorinated compounds now being found in children and adults. “In the human body, PFOA can last two to fourteen years—on average five—and honestly, you don’t want it there,” says Nadeinko. And these fluorine branches, she points out, can break off PFC trees with six carbons in their initial formulation just as they can from those with eight carbons.
 
Yet DuPont, one of the several companies offering products based on C6 chemistry, states that these Capstone products “are based on short chain molecules that cannot break down to PFOA in the environment.” The technology used to produce this new product, we’re told, requires “negligible PFOA and PFOA precursor content.” While the company maintains that these products are not made with PFOA, it also says that it “believes that no one can substantiate statements that fluorotelomer products [the basis of chemistry] are ‘PFOA Free’ or have ‘Zero PFOA’ even if test results are below the limit of detection.” This circular statement would seem to indicate that while these products are being marketed as “PFOA-free,” they actually may contain—and therefore be made with—these compounds….
 
Toxic effects observed have resulted not only from C8 but also from exposure to C6, and it appears that very small amounts—in micro molar concentrations—can produce adverse effects… Scientists can now locate the precise genetic receptors where many such chemical interactions occur and have learned that certain synthetic chemicals have molecular compositions and structures that enable them to interact with the site where a hormone would bind. This has been discovered for a number of common synthetic chemicals, including bisphenol A and the other chemicals Bruce Blumberg of UC Irvine called “obesogens,” for dioxins, and for perfluorinated compounds.” – Chasing Molecules: Poisonous Products, Human Health, and the Promise of Green Chemistry by Elizabeth Grossman
 
The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare..
 
“At one point, the video cuts to a skinny red cow standing in hay. Patches of its hair are missing, and its back is humped — a result, Wilbur speculates, of a kidney malfunction. Another blast of static is followed by a close-up of a dead black calf lying in the snow, its eye a brilliant, chemical blue. ‘‘One hundred fifty-three of these animals I’ve lost on this farm,’’ Wilbur says later in the video. ‘‘Every veterinarian that I’ve called in Parkersburg, they will not return my phone calls or they don’t want to get involved. Since they don’t want to get involved, I’ll have to dissect this thing myself. … I’m going to start at this head.’’
 
The video cuts to a calf’s bisected head. Close-ups follow of the calf’s blackened teeth (‘‘They say that’s due to high concentrations of fluoride in the water that they drink’’), its liver, heart, stomachs, kidneys and gall bladder. Each organ is sliced open, and Wilbur points out unusual discolorations — some dark, some green — and textures. ‘‘I don’t even like the looks of them,’’ he says. ‘‘It don’t look like anything I’ve been into before.’’
 
Bilott watched the video and looked at photographs for several hours. He saw cows with stringy tails, malformed hooves, giant lesions protruding from their hides and red, receded eyes; cows suffering constant diarrhea, slobbering white slime the consistency of toothpaste, staggering bowlegged like drunks. Tennant always zoomed in on his cows’ eyes. ‘‘This cow’s done a lot of suffering,’’ he would say, as a blinking eye filled the screen.
 
‘‘This is bad,’’ Bilott said to himself. ‘‘There’s something really bad going on here.’’
 
 
And since ABC removed this story regarding DuPont’s PFOAs
 
Whistleblower Questions Safety of Food Packaging
Former Employee Says Chemicals Come Off on Food
 
ABC News Investigation
 
Nov. 18, 2005
 
Could a Teflon chemical widely used in fast-food packages, candy wrappers, and microwave popcorn bags pose a health hazard?
 
A former DuPont senior engineer alleges the company long failed to disclose all it knew about the chemical. His allegations come as an environmental activist group has uncovered internal DuPont documents and provided them to the Food and Drug Administration for its review.
 
The FDA approved the chemical’s use in a wide range of food package in 1967. An FDA spokesman says the FDA has not changed its position that food packaging containing the chemical is safe for consumer use, but confirms that it is investigating the chemical’s safety.
 
Glen Evers, a 22-year veteran of DuPont, tells ABC News that DuPont failed to tell the FDA of internal studies showing that the chemical coating comes off food wrapping in greater concentrations than thought when the FDA first approved its use.
 
The chemical is widely used in the paper wrapping for fast foods such as french fries and pizza, as well as candy wrappers, microwave popcorn bags and other products. It helps to prevent grease stains from coming through the wrapper.
 
“You don’t see it, you don’t feel it, you can’t taste it,” Evers says. “But when you open that bag … and you start dipping your French fries in there, you are extracting fluorchemical … and you’re eating it.”
 
Once in the body, the chemical — zonyl — can break down into a chemical called PFOA. PFOA stays in the blood, a fact that was unknown when zonyl was first approved for use. The government says PFOA is now believed to be in the blood of nearly every American.
 
“It bioaccumulates, which means the chemical goes into the blood, and it stays there for a very long period of time,” says Evers.
 
Studies have linked PFOA to cancer, organ damage and other health effects in tests on laboratory animals. The Environmental Protection Agency currently is considering its safety in humans.
 
A DuPont memo from 1987, obtained by the Environmental Working Group, reveals test results that show the chemical zonyl was coming off food wrapping at three times the amount DuPont first thought it would.
 
“They never notified the FDA. They never said to the FDA, ‘We’re stopping our production of this product until we figure out what the problem is,’” Evers said.
 
DuPont is already under criminal investigation for failing to notify the government that PFOA might have been linked to birth defects of children born to workers at a DuPont plant in West Virginia.
 
“The documents that we are sending now to the FDA show that this is a pattern of cover-up and suppression,” said toxicologist Tim Kroop of the Environmental Working Group.
 
The company strongly denies any suggestion of a cover-up and insists the chemical is perfectly safe for use in food wrapping even though it does come off in small amounts. These small amounts, DuPont says, do not pose a health hazard. DuPont says it has “always complied with all FDA regulations and standards regarding these products.”
 
Evers is suing DuPont, asserting they fired him because of his opposition to some of their practices. DuPont says Evers “lost his job in a restructuring” and denies his allegations.
 
“DuPont thinks that they have pollution rights to the blood of every American, every man, woman and child in the United States,” says Evers.
 
ABC News’ Jill Rackmill, Dana Hughes and Rhonda Schwartz contributed to this report.
 
 
And we’re going for round two…. (And Americans believe that Russia is the problem?!!! America has lost their minds… The United States of Insanity…)

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This Department of Defense report has never been publicized to those serving in our military. The Department of Defense is not telling anyone in any of our armed forces that they will suffer the impacts of lead poisoning from their service to our nation and that their health conditions will deteriorate as they age….

“…High risk of heart disease, kidney damage, and dementia.”

“A review of the epidemiologic and toxicologic data allowed the committee to conclude that there is overwhelming evidence that the OSHA standard provides inadequate protection for DOD firing-range personnel and for any other worker populations covered by the general industry standard. Specifically, the premise that maintaining BLLs under 40 μg/dL for a working lifetime will protect workers adequately is not valid; by inference, the OSHA PEL and action level are also inadequate for protecting firing-range workers. The committee found sufficient evidence to infer causal relationships between BLLs under 40 μg/dL and adverse neurologic, hematopoietic, renal, reproductive, and cardio-vascular effects. The committee also found compelling evidence of developmental effects in offspring exposed to lead in utero and during breastfeeding, and this raises additional concerns about exposures of women of childbearing age….

Despite changes in military tactics and technology, proficiency in the handling of weapons remains a cornerstone in the training of the modern combat soldier. Modern military forces are trained on one or more small arms, including handguns, shotguns, rifles, and machine guns. Many of the projectiles used in military small arms contain lead. Exposure to lead during weapons training on firing ranges therefore is an important occupational-health concern.

Lead is a ubiquitous metal in the environment, and its adverse effects on human health are well documented. The nervous system is an important target of lead toxicity, which causes adverse cognitive, mood, and psychiatric effects in the central nervous system of adults; causes various peripheral nervous system effects; and has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Lead exposure also causes anemia, nephrotoxicity, a variety of adverse reproductive and developmental effects, small increases in blood pressure and an increased risk of hypertension particularly in middle-aged and older people, and various effects in other organ systems, including joint pain and gastrointestinal pain (ATSDR 2007; EPA 2012; NTP 2012).”

___________________

1After the committee completed its evaluation and released the prepublication draft of this report, the Army submitted data on BLLs for Department of the Army civilian personnel working at shoot houses. The Army’s submission can be obtained by contacting the National Research Council’s Public Access Records Office at (202) 334-3543 or paro@nas.edu.”

 

https://www.nap.edu/read/18249/chapter/2?fbclid=IwAR3hGjGU2ALCbaPK2Pb9DyNHotGcrWNf1IJqJISeCkBtAaxe_lzMamqz7B4#4

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It’s not only ethylene tree based synthetics that destroy the brain but also heavy metals. All metals hijack the way the body processes calcium in our biological machines.

PBS Nova’s Poisoned Water explains…

“NARRATOR: Dr. Kim Cecil is an investigator for the Cincinnati Lead Study.

DR. KIM CECIL: So, lead tricks the body into thinking it’s calcium. Whenever lead has got into your body, primarily through ingestion, it goes and hides where calcium should be, in the bones and in the cells of the brain.

Visualize a neuron. There’s the neuron that’s sending the signal and then another that’s receiving the signal, and, typically, calcium is in that gap.

NARRATOR: Calcium is essential for neurons to communicate, but when a child is exposed to lead, lead gets in that gap and blocks the flow of calcium. Without calcium, synapses get weaker and brain function suffers.
Understanding how we evolved with calcium helps you understand how destructive heavy metals are to our biological machines. Microcosmos: Four Billion Years of Microbial Evolution by Lynn Margulis and Dorian Sagan provides much understanding.

“Crucial to their transfer onto land was what animals did with the element calcium. Calcium is a raw material in the making of many of the most magnificent biological structures, such as the human skull or the White Cliffs of Dover. The amount of calcium in solution in the cytoplasm of a nucleated cell must always be kept around one part in ten million. Yet calcium in seawater can be 10,000 times or more higher than this. Calcium tends to rush into cells, causing them to be continually ridding themselves of it. As all cells with nuclei do now, the first animal cells had to continuously export calcium outside their cells in order to stay healthy. Today, calcium carbonate is made by special cells inside membraneous sacs. The chalky substance is transferred in precrystaline form via channels–along which run the ubiquitous microtubules–to the outside of the cell.

Calcium plays a central part in the metabolism of all nucleated cells. It plays an indispensable role in amoeboid cell movement, cell secretion, microtubule formation, and cell adhesion. Dissolved calcium must be continually removed from the surrounding solution for microtubules to function in mitosis, meiotic sex, and brain activity. Because the “chemo-” part of chemoelectric messages sent by the nerve cells in the brain has largely to do with calcium, the neuron-firing communication networks of the brain depend as much on calcium as telephone communication does on copper telephone wire. By 620 million years ago the first tiny animal brains had evolved.

Perhaps more important for these early animals was the use of calcium in the operation of muscles. Muscles contract when dissolved calcium and ATP are released in precise quantities around them. The calcium must be scrupulously kept in quantities far lower than those of seawater or chemistry takes over and the calcium phosphate comes out of the solution in a solid form. (This is why athletes overworking their muscles tend to develop calcium deposits.) Muscle tissue, and the actinomyosin proteins comprising it, tends to be the same in all animals. The origin of actin is an evolutionary mystery; an actinlike protein has been reported in the putative ancestor to our cells, Thermoplasma. If confirmed we have still another case of an invention that originated in the bacterial microcosm.

The soft bodied underwater worms and blobs of Ediacaran times swam using muscles. To do so they controlled their calcium metabolism. Since muscle contraction responds to calcium release, it is extremely probable that the early Cambrian sea creatures, even the earliest squiggling annelid worms, must surely have had muscles under calcium control. Like Greek and Roman breastplates and helmets, some of these early animals must have secreted bits and pieces of calcareous armor and protective films that were not yet full skeletons.

It is rather remarkable that in otherwise very closely related species, one will calcify while the other will not. For instance, the only difference between certain closely related species of coralline red algae is that one is covered by stony calcium carbonate plates while the other is totally soft. Stephen Weiner of the Weizmann Research Institute in Israel believes that the calcifying species makes enough of the proteins having a regular spacing to fit the calcium carbonate crystals in the proteins’ framework. The other species, however, makes too little or an altered form of the protein with inappropriate spacing. On the other hand, since in some cases separate species of organisms which branched apart millions of years ago will both produce calcium carbonate today, it is probable that the ability to precipitate calcium compounds in a regular manner has successfully evolved many times in many different species for many distinct purposes.

Always used by nucleated cells, excess calcium must be excreted or harmlessly stockpiled out of solution. Since Cambrian times organisms have been stockpiling their reserves as calcium phosphate, which takes such forms as teeth and bones, or as calcium carbonate, as in chalky shells.

Skeletons did not appear out of nowhere during the Cambrian: Ediacaran muscles preceded Cambrian skeletons. The need to continuously respond to calcium surpluses in the cell made it easy for some animals to stockpile calcium salts inside or outside their bodies in dump heaps that eventually became skeletons and body armor. Just as termite nests are largely constructed of insect excrement and saliva, so skeletons and teeth are made of compounds that originally had to be excreted as waste.

Most animal shells and outer coats today are composed of calcium carbonate. Tiny ocean protists such as foraminifera and coccolithophorids extruded so much calcium into the water over such long periods of time that they made the famous piece of English real estate, the White Cliffs of Dover, a towering deposit of limestone and chalk. (Like coal or oil, such organic carbon reserves are not wasted but held in biospheric storage until life discovers new ways of recycling them.)

The new organs that supplanted the old, waterlogged ones were forced to be successful. Gills, expert at culling oxygen from water, were useless in the air. Over the millennia they became relics, like the gill slits that look like tiny scars under the ears of human fetuses. Lungs which could deliver air to the circulatory system evolved in some chordates, such as the amphibians, reptiles, and mammals. An analogous system of air channels called trachea evolved in land-adapted arthropods such as spiders and insects.

When facing frightening environmental perils, organisms warded off the need for radical change by incorporating the new into the tried-an-true old. The assembly of bones that had evolved in swimming fish served later to support amphibians on land, and to aerodynamically support birds in the air. Calcium waste near muscles became basic construction materials. Early vertebrates evolved into fish–bilaterally symmetrical beings that were essentially escape artists and speedsters, darting away from predators and rapidly pursuing their prey.

Competition among vicious predators along with desiccation in shallow waters forced early animals to live on land. But the scorching earth was no happy alternative to the warring seas. The land was in some ways an Edenic paradise, a sanctuary originally free of dangerous predators. But it was also a separate hell–an environment of torturous sun, biting wind, and decreased buoyancy. Calcified structures such as snail shells began as dumps for excess calcium but wound up as a combination of gravitational support structures, shields against sunlight and predators, and organic “aquariums” protecting against the dangers of desiccation.”

Pages 184 – 187

Lead, Fluoride, Cadmium, Aluminum, Cobalt and more are all metals that destroy our biological machines. The Bleeding Edge documentary examined the dementia symptoms of those who received cobalt hip replacements. Understand that there’s little thought being applied to consumer health when they profit from selling you the products that destroy your health and they also profit from treating you.
“I was unaware that my particular implant, like most hip implants available in the United States, had only a cursory pre-market review by the FDA… Dr. Tower and DBEC were the first to recognize that excessive wear of metal-on-metal hips (a chrome-cobalt ball rubbing on a chrome-cobalt socket) could not only result in failure of the replacement because of damage to the tissues about the hip, but they also might result in cobalt poisoning (cobaltism).”
Heavy metals and synthetic chemical manufacturing are also why mot synthetics are contaminated with heavy metals. It’s why PVC frequently contains high levels of lead. That has not stopped manufacturers from manufacturing and selling infant baby products made with PVC.

 

 

Green Chemistry: Theory & Practice explains the use of heavy metals in synthetic chemical manufacturing.

3.1 Alternative feedstocks/starting materials

Currently, 98% of all organic chemicals synthesized in the United Sates are made from petroleum feedstocks. Petroleum refining takes up 15% of the total energy used in the US, and its energy usage is rising because the low quality raw petroleum available now requires more energy for refinement. During conversion to useful organic chemicals, petroleum undergoes oxidation, the addition of oxygen or an equivalent; this oxidation step has historically been one of the most environmentally polluting steps in chemical synthesis. As a result of these consideration, it is important to reduce our use of petroleum-based products by using alternative feedstocks….

The exploration of biological sources of alternative feedstocks need not be limited to agricultural products: agricultural waste or biomass, and non-food-related bioproducts, which are often made up of a variety of lignocellulosic materials, may provide important alternative feedstocks.

Other classes of alternative feedstocks are also emerging, such as light. For example, heavy metals, which are often used in petroleum oxidation processes, are also quite toxic and are carcinogens or cause damage to neurological systems. Recently discovered alternative syntheses replace the heavy metal reagents with the use of visible light to carry out the required chemical transformations.”

Chasing Molecules – The Polycarbonate Problem. BPA, Benzene, Phenols, & Carbonyl Chloride (also known as Phosgene)Chasing Molecules by Elizabeth Grossman
An excerpt from the chapter, “The Polycarbonate Problem.”BPA, Benzene, Phenols, & Carbonyl Chloride (also known as Phosgene)

“Phenols are commonly made by oxidizing benzene, which essentially means adding oxygen to benzene.”

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Public Health Implications of Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC)

Great Lakes Report

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Today’s important history and science lesson is on Diethylstilbestrol (DES), the first synthetic hormone technology created from petroleum on the branch of the eythlene tree that was marketed and put in widespread use. (I’ll cover other benzene/phenol-based hormone technology markets next)

The Devil’s Chemists: 24 Conspirators of the International Farben Cartel Who Manufacture War by Josiah E. DuBose (Prosecutor of IG Farben Directors at the Nuremberg Trials) explains the ethylene tree during the testimony of Otto Ambros who was IG Farben’s Director of Chemical Operations and Hitler’s Director of Chemical Weapons.

“Ambros bowed as he took oath, exhibiting his sketch in all directions. He waved his counsel aside for the moment. He explained: “This tree of many branches I choose to call the Ethylene Tree to symbolize the Good and Evil in nature.”

Ethylene oxide, he went on, was the trunk which bore many branches “green with peaceful uses” and a few that were rotten with potential destruction. He pointed to lines he had drawn to cut off the rotten branches. Green branches had been his sole interest: soap for dirty soldiers, paint and cleaning agents for vehicles. “I still do not understand why I am here. The collapse promised everything but that I would be arrested.”

At Gerdorf, after those senseless investigations, the Americans had been kind enough to lend him a jeep and driver, to take him back home. Surely, if he had deserved arrest, the French at Ludwigshafen would have picked him up. He’d lived in Ludwigshafen since the mid-1920’s; people there thought he was just born for the place. If Heidelberg was the seat of chemical knowledge, Ludwigshafen was nature’s laboratory; and Ambros was the sort of man who liked earth running through his fingers. At Ludwigshafen, more productive than any other single Farben installation, were planted the synthetic seeds of every Farben product. Ludwigshafen put out the elementary compounds that became hormones and vitamins under Hoerlein at Elberfeld. At Ludwigshafen, the organic roots under careful cultivation grew their first ersatz offshoots. His “mother” was Ludwigshafen, said Ambros; but he owed a good deal, too, to his real father, a professor of agricultural chemistry, who had taken him into the laboratory before he could toddle. It was understandable that, at first sight of Oswiecem, he noted it was “predominantly agricultural terrain.”
When Bosch and Krauch hired Ambros, they got a young man with brains as well as feet in the soil. Bosch, recognizing a young excitable genius, turned him loose to study natural dyes and rosins and yeast breeding and sugar fermentation. Soon the Ethylene Tree was bearing synthetic twigs based on his studies.” – page 170

(Important to note that the “A” in Sarin stands for Ambros and he fails to explain the chemical weapon or “evil” branches of this synthetic tree to the court. The tree is not evil, simply biochemically toxic to biological systems from their fossil fuel or ancient dead rooted origins.)

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) Information
In 1938, DES (diethylstilbestrol) was the first synthetic estrogen to be created. For a historical perspective see the DES Timeline. (The Timeline follows)

Never patented, DES was marketed using hundreds of brand names in the mistaken belief it prevented miscarriages and premature deliveries.
DES was prescribed primarily between 1938 and 1971 (but not limited to those years). It was considered the standard of care for problem pregnancies from the late 1940s well into the 1960s in the U.S. and was widely prescribed during that time. DES was sometimes even included in prenatal vitamins so there are many individuals who were not actually given DES but were exposed to it anyway. DES was given by injection, pill and vaginal suppository (sometimes called pessaries).

In April 1971 the FDA told doctors to stop using DES for their pregnant patients, however it was never banned. Specifically, the FDA said DES was contraindicated for pregnancy use. In some rare cases American doctors either didn’t hear of, or simply ignored the message and continued prescribing DES. Internationally, DES use during pregnancy continued for many subsequent years.

In the United States, an estimated 5–10 million people were exposed to DES, including women who were prescribed DES while pregnant, and the children born of those pregnancies.

Now researchers are investigating whether DES health issues are extending into the next generation, the so-called DES Grandchildren. As study results come in, there is growing evidence that this group has been adversely impacted by a drug prescribed to their grandmothers.
Interestingly, years after developing the chemical formulation for DES, its creator, Sir E. Charles Dodds was knighted for his accomplishment. It was fully expected that his synthetic estrogen would help women worldwide. At the time it was not known how dangerous this drug would be to developing fetuses.

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) Timeline
1938 – DES is created as first synthetic estrogen by Sir E. Charles Dodds in England.
1940 – French medical journal reports that DES caused mammary tumors in male mice.
1947 – DES formally granted FDA approval for use as a miscarriage preventative.
Harvard husband and wife team of physician and biochemist George and Olive Smith publish report extolling use of high doses of DES during pregnancy. This report launches wide-scale use of DES.
1953 – DES proven ineffective when William Dieckmann, M.D., of University of Chicago’s Lying-In Hospital conducts first controlled, randomized, double-blind study on use of DES during pregnancy. Published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the research reveals women receiving DES suffered a higher rate of miscarriages, yet DES continued to be prescribed to women until 1971. (Pharmaceutical companies heavily promoted DES use to doctors.)
1959 – U.S. Agriculture Department bans DES as a growth stimulant for chickens and lambs after high DES levels in these animals produced side effects, such as male breast growth in humans.
1971 – Arthur Herbst, M.D. et al publish report in New England Journal of Medicine linking DES exposure before birth, to a rare vaginal cancer in girls and young women – clear cell adenocarcinoma.
On the basis of this study the FDA issues a Drug Bulletin to physicians, stating that DES is contra-indicated for use in pregnant women. The FDA did not ban DES, but only urged doctors to stop prescribing it for their pregnant patients. Most, but not all, stopped.
1970s – Researchers study the effects of DES on DES Daughters and find significant abnormalities in the reproductive organs of these women, which often result in infertility or serious problems in pregnancy.
1975 – National Cancer Institute (NCI) begins DES-Adenosis (DESAD) project, the first government-sponsored study designed to “assess the magnitude and severity of the health hazard to DES-exposed female offspring.”
1978 – DES Action is founded as the national non-profit consumer group for people exposed to DES.
Secretary of the Department of Health, Education & Welfare, Joseph Califano, convenes the National DES Task Force. It was charged with reviewing all aspects of the DES problem and with making recommendations for research and health care of the exposed.
The National DES Task Force issues physician advisory, recommending doctors review their records and notify patients who were prescribed DES while pregnant. (Most doctors, however, did not).
1979 – First successful legal trial over DES injuries. Joyce Bichler, 25-year old cancer survivor, is awarded half a million dollars in case against Eli Lilly*.
1980 – DES banned in cattle feed.
1992 – After years of grassroots organizing led by DES Action, Congress passes the first federal legislation mandating a national program of research, outreach and education about DES.
1993 – National Cancer Institute (NCI) announces grants for a program of public and health care provider education about DES.
1995 – National Cancer Institute establishes committee to study non-cancer effects resulting from DES exposure; consumer education booklets published by NCI.
1997 – Congress passes legislation authorizing renewed funding for DES research and education.
2003 – CDC’s DES Update launches national education effort with website and publications to educate DES-exposed individuals and their health care providers.

A Healthy Baby Girl Documentary by Judith Helfand

A Healthy Baby Girl is an autobiographical documentary which explores the full complexity and impact of DES exposure. (DES or Diethylstilbestrol is a drug, an orally active synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen that was first synthesized in 1938. In 1971 it was found to be a teratogen when given to pregnant women.) Helfand’s mother was one of five million American women to whom DES was prescribed between 1947 and 1971, after being told by their doctors that the drug would prevent miscarriage. Florence Helfand was a typical DES mother: white, middle-class, and confident she was receiving the best prenatal care money could buy.

DES was not only proven to be completely ineffective in preventing miscarriage but for more than thirty years, pharmaceutical companies sold DES to millions of pregnant women knowing that the drug was toxic and carcinogenic. Only in 1971, when doctors discovered the link between DES and vaginal cancer in some young women exposed in utero, was the drug taken off the U.S. market for use during pregnancy. It continued to be sold overseas. Today there is no definitive estimate of how many millions of mothers and children have been exposed to DES worldwide.

Of the two and a half million DES daughters in the U.S., roughly half have malformed reproductive organs and suffer with infertility, high risk pregnancies, and multiple miscarriages. There are 2.5 million DES sons. They have not been as closely monitored but there are reports of male infertility, and links to testicular abnormalities and cancer. Researchers continue to uncover frightening facts about the life-long effect of exposure to DES, including higher rates of breast cancer in DES mothers and daughters, and damage to the endocrine and immune systems. Effects on the third generation – DES grandchildren – are as yet unknown.
Like its infamous contemporary DDT, DES is an estrogen-mimicking synthetic chemical, wreaking havoc on the hormonal system. These chemicals have been termed “hand-me-down-poisons” by Theo Colborn, Dianne Dumanoski, and John Peterson Myers, the authors of Our Stolen Future, because their toxic effects are not only experienced by those who are directly exposed, but also show up in their children as birth defects, cancer, or infertility. Such chemicals are in widespread use today in pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and manufacturing. The facilities simply do not exist to detect, test, and regulate more than a tiny fraction. The very nature of their toxicity – to our reproductive abilities – bears a potent threat for our future.

Here are additional links for more information regarding DES (Diethylstilbestrol)
National Cancer Institute – DES: Questions and Answers
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/DES
The CDC – DES Update Homepage
http://www.cdc.gov/DES/
Our Stolen Future: Excerpts from Chapter 4. Hormone Havoc
http://www.ourstolenfuture.org/Basics/chapter_excerpt..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diethylstilbestrol

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Our media and all our institutions work for the ruling class. I really wish the working class would wake up and see how they are being destroyed instead of fighting each other….

The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, The CIA, and The Rise of America’s Secret Government by David Talbot – 2015 (The whole book should be read but here’s some important excerpts…)

“From their earliest days on Wall Street–where they ran Sullivan and Cromwell, the most powerful corporate law firm in the nation–their overriding commitment was always to the circle of accomplished, privileged men whom they saw as the true seat of power in America… The Dulles brothers were not intimidated by mere presidents. When President Franklin Roosevelt pushed through New Deal legislation to restrain the rampant greed and speculation that had brought the country economic ruin, John Foster Dulles simply gathered his corporate clients in his Wall Street law office and urged them to defy the president. “Do not comply,” he told them. “Resist the law with all your might, and soon everything will be alright.” – Prologue

“In early April 1945, Henry Morgenthau went down to the presidential retreat in Warm Springs, Georgia, where FDR was convalescing, to urge him to directly confront the State Department cabal that seemed hell-bent on appeasing the country’s German enemies and antagonizing its Soviet allies. Sitting down for cocktails with the president, Morgenthau was shaken by the President’s “very haggard” appearance. “His hands shook so that he started to knock the glasses over… I found his memory bad and he was constantly confusing names.”.. “We’ve been moving that spectrum and we need to continue moving that spectrum. After drinks and dinner, Roosevelt seemed to rally and he asked Morgenthau what he had in mind. The Treasury secretary told him it was time “to break the State Department” and replace the old guard with loyal New Dealers. FDR assured Morgenthau he was with him “100 percent.” The next afternoon, April 12, Roosevelt died after suffering a massive cerebral hemorrhage. ” page 66

“We cannot forget [for example] that one of the big war factories in Germany was the Opel Company which was owned and financed by the General Motors Corporation, a company in which Secretary Stettinius had a great interest. The biggest electric company in Germany was owned and financed by the General Electric Company of New York. We have here very potent reasons why a large and important group in this country is trying to pipe down on the serious investigations of [corporate Germany’s collaboration with the Nazis].” pages 66 – 67

“he boarded a ship for Alexandria, Egypt–the next stop in the Nazi exterminator’s long and winding ratline. Rauff would cap his bloody career in Chile, where he became a top advisor to DINA, military dictator Augusto Pinochet’s own Gestapo.” – page 106

“De Gaulle’s foreign ministry was the source of the most provocative charges in the press, including the allegation that CIA agents sought funding for the De Gaulle coup from multinational corporations, such as Belgian mining companies operation in the Congo. Ministry officials also alleged that Americans with ties to extremist groups had surfaced in Paris during the coup drama, including one identified as a “political counselor for the Luce [media] group,” who was heard to say, “An operation is being prepared in Algiers to put a stop to communism, and we will not fail as we did in Cuba…. After de Gaulle was elected president in 1958, he sought to purge the French government of its CIA-connected elements.” page 415 – 416

“Suspicions of a conspiracy were particularly strong in France, where President de Gaulle himself had been the target of CIA machinations and had survived a barrage of gunfire to his own limousine. After returning from Kennedy’s November 24 funeral in Washington, de Gaulle gave a remarkably candid assessment of the assassination to his information minister, Alain Peyrefitte. “What happened to Kennedy is what nearly happened to me,” confided the French president. “His story is the same as mine… It looks like a cowboy story. The security forces were in cahoots with the extremists.”…. page 566 – 567

“These were some of James Jesus Angleton’s dying words… “Fundamentally, the founding fathers of U.S. intelligence were liars,” Angleton told Trento in an emotionless voice. “The better you lied and the more you betrayed, the more likely you would be promoted… Outside of their duplicity, the only thing they had in common was a desire for absolute power. I did things that, in looking back on my life, I regret. But I was part of it and loved being in it.
He invoked the names of the high eminences who had run the CIA in is day—Dulles, Helms, Wisner. These men were “the grand masters,” he said. “If you were in a room with them, you were in a room full of people that you had to believe would deservedly end up in hell.”
Angleton took another slow sip from his steaming cup. “I guess I will see them there soon.”…

When Angleton’s successors cracked open his legendary safes and vaults, out spilled the sordid secrets of a lifetime of service to Allen Dulles…
The safecracking team was also horrified to find files relating to both Kennedy assassinations and stomach-turning photos of Robert Kennedy’s autopsy, which were promptly burned. These, too, were mommentos of Angleton’s years of faithful service to Allen Dulles.” – page 620

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Our Ruling class have always utilized munitions to enforce their slavery based economic models. (It’s too bad that the working class fails to understand that munitions come in bomb, pill, injection, spray, and chemical additive forms and are born on the ethylene tree rooted in fossil fuels and primarily petroleum feedstocks.)

Slave Patrols: Law and Violence in Virginia and The Carolinas by Sally E. Hadden & The Militia and Militarism (1899) by Rosa Luxemburg. An important history lesson

“The colonists’ willingness to run the risks of owning slaves sprang both from their racism and from their greed. Not content to market products cultivated solely by their own efforts, English colonists rapidly began using indentured servants and bondsmen to increase their productive capacity. The first settlers of Virginia and the Carolinas either arrived with their own slaves or soon bought Africans from traders visiting the colonies….. Thus the laws that Southern colonists created to regulate their slaves did not come exclusively from England, but were derived from their legal imagination, from their long-standing participation in the militia, and from neighboring Caribbean slaveholding colonies… For all its flaws and later alterations, the Barbadian slave code of 1661 provided the model for several other English slave-holding colonies. The 1664 Jamaican code and the Antiguan slave code of 1702 were patterned after it. Both of these areas experienced a huge influx of Barbadian planters to their islands. Likewise, when Barbadians settled South Carolina after 1670, colonists borrowed heavily from their Barbadian experiences in designing the first slave laws and enforcement groups on land.”

“Controlling slave movement in cities created special problems for patrols… Many city slaves went without passes until the patrols became active. Rather than force owners to write passes routinely, larger cities like Charleston devised badge systems: a slave’s owner purchased a badge from the city, good for one year, that the slave had to wear at all times. Although slaves did not always wear their badges, and some owners flouted the law, badges gave patrollers a means to avoid inspecting passes in the largest Southern cities. Even seventy years after freedom came, one former bondsman declared that he still had his badge and pass to show the patrol, so that no one could molest him.” 114

“With us, every citizen is concerned in the maintenance of order, and in promoting honesty and industry among those of the lowest class who are our slaves; and our habitual vigilance renders standing armies, whether of soldiers or policemen, entirely unnecessary. Small guards in our cities, and occasional patrols in the country, insure us a repose and security known no where else.” 1845 letter from former South Carolina governor James Henry Hammond to Thomas Clarkson.

“Innocent slaves found themselves named as insurrectionary accomplices, particularly in areas where bondsmen outnumbered whites. After the Turner rebellion in 1831, slaves in Virginia and North Carolina were apprehended who clearly had no intention of rebelling, merely because someone wanted charges of insurrection brought against them. Joseph Skinner, a North Carolinian, believed that patrols abused harmless bondsmen excessively during insurrection scares. “Not the least outrage has been here committed except by a few patrol… much more [is] to be apprehended from the rash unparalleled conduct of whites than from an insurrection of the negroes.” Although Southern whites spent most of their time living in complacent vulnerability, when roused from their torpor, the mortal fear of slave rebellions frequently prompted overreactions.” – page 143

“The young slave Harriet Jacobs vividly described how patrols behaved at the height of the Turner insurrection scare: every home in the town was to be searched, and she knew it would be done by patrols augmented with country ruffians and poor whites. She thought the impoverished whites who joined the patrollers exulted in the task because it gave them opportunity to “exercise a little brief authority, and show their subserviency to the slaveholders.” During the day, they searched houses, and in the night “they formed themselves into patrol bands, and went wherever they chose among the colored people, acting out their brutal will.”… for two weeks, the patrols abused the bondsmen and free blacks by whipping them, throwing them in jail, and stealing their belongings.” – page 146

“One of James Monroe’s correspondents wrote that “[t]he disaffection of the blacks is daily gaining extent & boldness which may produce effects, at the approaching festival of Xmas… The same heedless Imbecility that destroys our Efforts against the external Enemy, paralyses every thing like vigilance & Police, in respect to the more dangerous internal population.” 154 pages 162 – 163

Virginia residents proved reluctant to use their militia against the British, not because they feared their old enemy, but because of the danger posed by slaves, who would be that much stronger when the militia left to fight the British. 156 Similarly, Vice President Elbridge Gerry’s son described increased wartime patrolling in Washington D.C., as an indispensable replacement for the militia’s presence. In his diary he recorded that “[a]s the militia are ordered off, I expect to patrole more frequently, and this is very necessary, for the blacks in some places refuse to work, and they say they shall soon be free, and then the white people must look out…. Should we be attacked, there will be great danger of the blacks rising, and to prevent this, patroles are very necessary, to keep them in awe.” 157
http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674012349

The Militia and Militarism (1899) by Rosa Luxemburg (There’s a reason she was assassinated)

“How can this phenomenon operate on behalf of the working class? Ostensibly in such a way as to rid it of a part of its reserve army, i.e. those who force down wages, by maintaining a standing army; in this way its working conditions improve. And what does this mean? Only this: in order to reduce the supply in the labour market, in order to restrict competition, the worker in the first place gives away a portion of his salary in the form of indirect taxes in order to maintain his competitors as soldiers. Secondly, he makes his competitor into an instrument with which the capitalist state can contain, and if necessary suppress bloodily, any move he makes to improve his situation (strikes, coalitions, etc.); and thus this instrument can thwart the very same improvement in the worker’s situation for which, according to Schippel, militarism was necessary. Thirdly, the worker makes this competitor into the most solid pillar of political reaction in the State and thus of his own enslavement.

In other words, by accepting militarism, the worker prevents his wages from being reduced by a certain amount, but in return is largely deprived of the possibility of fighting continuously for an increase in his wage and an improvement of his situation. He gains as a seller of his labour, but at the same time loses his political freedom of movement as a citizen, so that he must ultimately also lose as the seller of his labour. He removes a competitor from the labour market only to see a defender of his wage slavery arise in his place; he prevents his wages being lowered only to find that the prospects both of a permanent improvement in his situation and of his ultimate economic, political and social liberation are diminished. This is the actual meaning of the ‘release’ of economic pressure on the working class achieved by militarism. Here, as in all opportunistic political speculation, we see the great aims of socialist class emancipation sacrificed to petty practical interests of the moment, interests moreover which, when examined more closely, prove to be essentially illusory….

But what makes supplying the military in particular essentially more profitable than, for example, State expenditures on cultural ends (schools, roads, etc.), is the incessant technical innovations of the military and the incessant increase in its expenditures. Militarism thus represents an inexhaustible, and indeed increasingly lucrative, source of capitalist gain, and raises capital to a social power of the magnitude confronting the worker in, for example, the enterprises of Krupp and Stumm. Militarism – which to society as a whole represents a completely absurd economic waste of enormous productive forces – and which for the working class means a lowering of its standard of living with the objective of enslaving it socially – is for the capitalist class economically the most alluring, irreplaceable kind of investment and politically and socially the best support for their class rule. Therefore, when Schippel abruptly declares militarism to be a necessary ‘release’ of economic pressure, not only does he apparently confuse society’s interests with that of capitalism’s interests, thus – as we said at the outset – adopting the bourgeois point of view, but he also bases his argument on the principle of a harmony of interests between capital and labour by assuming that every economic advantage to the entrepreneur is necessarily an advantage to the worker as well.”
https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1899/02/26.htm

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A critically important history and science lesson and back to the munition branch on the ethylene tree that produces synthetic hormone markets. (Essentially, it’s a chemical weapon in pill and injection form. Chlorine, benzene, and sulfur build colossal markets that destroy working class health.)

Our ruling class have utilized these markets to profit from the working class they exploit and destroy. There’s a very dark history concealed behind planned parenthood that was utilized to expand their highly profitable synthetic hormone capitalist markets. (Working class citizens are not educated about the technologies they buy nor their harmful biological impacts for a reason.) These technologies were first marketed and sold to impoverished women but now they have been repackaged and are sold to all working class women. Mirena consumers are now having to learn all the painful lessons that poor working class women had to learn from the first synthetic progesterone product marketed to them in the 1990s. Norplant was the first levonorgestrel product put on the market. (It’s still marketed and sold in the Southern United States as is Depro-Provera, another synthetic progesterone product.)

Knowing history is very important to understanding prevention of exploitation and harm to all working class women. Ladies, you’re all in the same selected boat now.

Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present by Harriet A. Washington (Fellow in ethics at Harvard Medical School and a fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health.) explains history and the harm of these highly profitable technologies.

“German doctors became obsessed with regaining an imaginary Nordic purity even before the 1933 rise of Hitler and National Socialism. But U.S. national eugenic policies had employed unconscionable medical violations against those they considered unfit, including blacks, since 1910. The lions of American and German eugenics were united not only by a shared vision of racial purity but also by the International Society for Racial Hygiene. Chief among its American members was mathematician and biologist Charles Davenport, PhD., who established the Station for Experiment Evolution (SEE) and, in 1910, the privately funded and seminal Eugenics Record Office (ERO) at Cold Spring Harbor on Long Island, New York, which joined with the SEE in 1920 under the aegis of the Carnegie Institution.” – The Black Stork: The Eugenic Control of African American Reproduction, Chapter 8 from Medical Apartheid (page 193)

The dark origins of Planned Parenthood.
“The twentieth century saw the dawn of the medical philosophy eugenics, derived from the Greek word eugenes, meaning “well-born.” The word was coined by Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin….

Eugenicists promulgated the weeding out of undesirable societal elements by discouraging or preventing the birth of children with “bad” genetic profiles. The term “well-born” has a double meaning of “born healthy” and “born wealthy,” and this is fitting because eugenic scientists and their disciples constantly confused the concepts of biological hereditary fitness with those of class and race. Highly educated persons of good social class were considered eugenically superior; the poor, the uneducated, criminals, recent immigrants, blacks, and the feebleminded were eugenic misfits. Eugenicists invoked the term “racial hygiene” as frequently as they did the word “eugenics,” and even a cursory glance at the charts, photographs, and diagrams used to popularize eugenic ideals reveals that the unfit were “swarthy” “black” and ugly by Ango-Saxon standards, with flattened noses, wiry hair, and prognathous profiles.” – Medical Apartheid by Harriet A. Washington (page 191)

“The Germans are beating us at our own game,” Virginian eugenicist Dr. Joseph S. Dejarnette sighed in thinly veiled admiration during a 1934 speech in which he urged the Virginia legislature to expand its sterilization laws.”….

The Negro Project. Margaret Sanger was the most famous American populizer of eugenics…. Sanger shaped American reproductive policy by toppling the “Comstock laws” against contraceptive distribution, by catalyzing the development of the birth control pill, and by founding the organization that became Planned Parenthood, the nation’s twelfth-largest charitable organization. But she did so in alliance with eugenicists, and through initiatives such as the Negro Project, Sanger exploited black stereotypes in order to reduce the fertility of African Americans….

While Sanger’s early campaigns were aimed primarily at Eastern Europeans, she turned her attention to blacks in 1929. That year, Lothrop Stoddard wrote his book “The Rising Tide of Color Against White World Supremacy” while serving on the board of directors of Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL), and Sanger’s lover, Havelock Ellis, reviewed it favorably in her journal Birth Control Review. That year, she also discarded labels such as “good or bad breeding stock” in favor of “class” or “income level.”…

In January 1939, Sanger’s American Birth Control League merged with the Clinical Research Bureau to form the Birth Control Federation of America (BCFA). Later that year, Sanger devised the Negro Project, which “was established for the benefit of the colored people,” specifically black women who were being denied access to city health services. These first experimental “family planning centers” sought to find the best way of reducing the black population by promoting eugenic principles and were also founded in black areas such as Macon County, Alabama, site of the notorious PHS syphilis study. Du Bois also suggested approaching black churches, declaring them open to “intelligent propaganda of any sort..
Sanger took Du Bois’s advice, writing, “The most successful educational approach to the Negro is through a religious appeal… We do not want the word to get out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” She recruited the support of such luminaries as Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., of the Abyssinian Baptist Church and, later, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Sanger also wanted a black doctor and social worker to staff the clinic in order to gain black patients’ trust… By 1983, when blacks constituted only 12 percent of the population, 43 percent of the women sterilized in federally funded family planning programs were African Americans…

According to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), 41 percent of black women who use contraception were sterilized….

By 1978, doctors also began administering the drug Depo-Provera—but only in research studies and almost exclusively to poor women of color. Depo-Provera is the Upjohn Company’s brand name for medroxyprogesterone acetate, which is also called DMPA. In 1978, the drug had just been FDA-approved for use as a cancer therapy.* (This indicates that it is more than likely an organochlorine developed from mustard gas technologies. There’s a reason hair loss is a side effect because mustard gas evolved into chemotherapy technologies.)
In 1973, after the government discovered that beagles on which the drug had been tested developed breast cancer, it had refused to fund further testing of the drug as a contraceptive… American doctors found it appropriate to administer Depro-Provera as an experimental contraceptive to healthy Native American and black patients. In 1978, the FDA criticized an Emory University study of Deposition-Provera as having needlessly imperiled the lives of 4,700 women, all black, and in 1992 an FDA board warned, “Never has a drug whose target population is entirely healthy been shown to be so pervasively carcinogenic in animals as has Depo-Provera.”….

Norplant was developed by the Population Council, a New York foundation that researches and tests contraceptives on poor women of color abroad. It has subsequently been used by more than a million U.S. women, nearly all poor: Planned Parenthood notes that 90 percent of Norplant implant ions are paid through Medicaid in forty-three states. A higher proportion of African American women than white women receive these implants, chiefly in public and low-income clinics. Why? Frederick Osborn, a Population Council founder, wrote, “Birth control and abortion are turning out to be major eugenic steps. But if they had been advanced for eugenic reasons… [that] would have retarded or stopped their acceptance.”

The Laurence G. Paquin Middle School clinic became the first site for Norplant implantation; 345 of its 350 girls were black. Thus policy makers focused upon the fertility of black girls, and Norplant was deployed via school-based health clinics, the first one hundred of which opened at black or minority schools… But in 1992, Norplant had never been tested in such young girls; researchers were monitoring their health and reactions for the Population Council. In other words, Norplant implantation in these girls constituted a large-scale national experiment, and this research component placed pressure upon the school’s clinic staff to achieve as near a 100 percent participation rate as possible. They, in turn, pressured all the girls to undergo implantation, typically citing confidentiality to bypass their parents. As one aggrieved African American parent put it, “My daughter can be implanted with Norplant or have an abortion without my input or knowledge via the school-based clinic, but my suburban co-workers field calls from [school] nurses who must get their permission to give their daughters an aspirin.”

It is not surprising that the conservative National Review praised the Baltimore experiment, declaring, “better a prophylactic than an abortion,” as if these were the only two options for black girls. But so did the New York Times and the Philadelphia Inquirer. The latter suggested in an infamous December 12, 1990, editorial that black women be paid to have Norplant implanted in or to “reduce the underclass.”…

More black children are living in poverty, but the black teen pregnancy rate is falling, not rising, so it cannot be the key impetus behind the surge in black poverty. In fact, poverty precedes pregnancy: The teen mothers are already poor, and children who are poor are at higher risk for precocious pregnancy….

Most media analyses did not speak so directly of Norplant as key to stemming black reproduction; instead, coded terminology such as “inner-city,” “underclass,” “welfare mother,” and “urban poor” was widely understood to denote black women.

The media and lawmakers’ debates all stressed the Norplant is a safe contraceptive. But is it? According to a 1995 report in the Journal of Family Practice, 95 percent of women in a large-scale trial of Norplant had at least one side effect—80 percent suffered menstrual changes; 32 percent experienced weight gain, 24 percent headaches, 16 percent mood changes, and 15 percent acne. Norplant is contraindicated for women with diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, a tendency toward blood clots, and acute liver dysfunction, all of which African American women develop and die from at higher rates than do white women. Norplant is also contraindicated in women with breast cancer, a disease that kills African American women at rates up to 20 percent higher than white women… Norplant was the subject of a recall in 2000 and it was taken off the market in July 2002…. – Medical Apartheid by Harriet Washington (Chapter 5: The Black Stork)

The contraceptive Norplant has given birth to some unexpected offspring —lawsuits from women who say its implantable capsules are extremely difficult to take out or have caused serious or intolerable side effects…

At the time the contraceptive was approved by the Food and Drug Administration, some women’s health experts urged caution in that little data existed on its long-term effects. Some women using it in studies also reported unpredictable or unusually heavy menstrual bleeding and other problems. Attorney Mike Hackard of Sacramento, Calif., who filed one of the class-action suits, said his clients weren’t adequately warned of the method’s side effects. Among their complaints, according to the suit, are severe headaches, anxiety and panic attacks, depression, acne, weight gain of 60 to 100 pounds, excess growth or loss of hair, ovarian cysts, breast pain, skin discoloration, infection at the implant site or numbness in the arm, as well as a variety of menstrual disorders.”They’re talking about extensive bleeding that is splitting up their marriages, requiring extensive sanitary equipment and continually soiling their clothes and beds,” Hackard said last week. “This is severe bleeding that goes beyond monthly menstrual bleeding.” Others stop menstruating, he said.
Hackard said the most severe alleged side effects he knows of involve women who suffered enlarged ovaries and fallopian tubes that burst, causing the need for hysterectomies and/ or the removal of the tubes and ovaries.”One woman was hospitalized 12 times” for such alleged complications, Hackard said.https://www.mcall.com/news/mc-xpm-1994-09-26-2985163-story.html

Pfizer Settles Norplant Lawsuits For $29.5 Million
After 17 years of litigation, Pfizer has reached a preliminary agreement to settle a Norplant contraceptive class action lawsuit for $29.5 million, according to Mealey’s Drugs & Devices Report.
http://www.expertbriefings.com/news/pfizer-settles-norplant-lawsuits-for-29-5-million/

Bayer has now re-packaged their synthetic progesterone product and created a device to actually put levonorgestrel up inside female reproductive organs. What could possibly go wrong?….

Thousands of women nationwide sued Bayer Pharmaceuticals over Mirena birth control after they say it perforated the uterus, damaged organs and caused pseudotumor cerebri — an abnormal fluid buildup in the skull. These women say Mirena complications led to diminished quality of life and they live in fear of future complications.The lawsuits accuse the company of selling a dangerous product. They also claim the company used deceptive advertising and hid the risk of complications. Currently, there are no Mirena class action lawsuits in the U.S., but there are three main groups of individual lawsuits, two in New York and one in New Jersey. So far, Bayer has only offered to settle perforation lawsuits.
https://www.drugwatch.com/mirena/lawsuits/

I highly recommend all women and men watch The Bleeding Edge about medical device technologies and their biological harm.

As long as working class continue buying capitalist products from his ethylene tree then they will continue destroying themselves and enriching the pockets of their destroyers.

“Ambros bowed as he took oath, exhibiting his sketch in all directions. He waved his counsel aside for the moment. He explained: “This tree of many branches I choose to call the Ethylene Tree to symbolize the Good and Evil in nature.”

Ethylene oxide, he went on, was the trunk which bore many branches “green with peaceful uses” and a few that were rotten with potential destruction. He pointed to lines he had drawn to cut off the rotten branches. Green branches had been his sole interest: soap for dirty soldiers, paint and cleaning agents for vehicles. “I still do not understand why I am here. The collapse promised everything but that I would be arrested.”

At Gerdorf, after those senseless investigations, the Americans had been kind enough to lend him a jeep and driver, to take him back home. Surely, if he had deserved arrest, the French at Ludwigshafen would have picked him up. He’d lived in Ludwigshafen since the mid-1920’s; people there thought he was just born for the place. If Heidelberg was the seat of chemical knowledge, Ludwigshafen was nature’s laboratory; and Ambros was the sort of man who liked earth running through his fingers. At Ludwigshafen, more productive than any other single Farben installation, were planted the synthetic seeds of every Farben product. Ludwigshafen put out the elementary compounds that became hormones and vitamins under Hoerlein at Elberfeld. Ludwigshafen put out the elementary compounds that became hormones and vitamins under Hoerlein at Elberfeld. At Ludwigshafen, the organic roots under careful cultivation grew their first ersatz offshoots. His “mother” was Ludwigshafen, said Ambros; but he owed a good deal, too, to his real father, a professor of agricultural chemistry, who had taken him into the laboratory before he could toddle. It was understandable that, at first sight of Oswiecem, he noted it was “predominantly agricultural terrain.”
When Bosch and Krauch hired Ambros, they got a young man with brains as well as feet in the soil. Bosch, recognizing a young excitable genius, turned him loose to study natural dyes and rosins and yeast breeding and sugar fermentation. Soon the Ethylene Tree was bearing synthetic twigs based on his studies.” – The Devil’s Chemists: 24 Conspirators of the International Farben Cartel Who Manufacture War by Josiah E. DuBose (Prosecutor of IG Farben Directors at the Nuremberg Trials) page 170

(Important to note that the “A” in Sarin stands for Ambros and he fails to explain the chemical weapon or “evil” branches of this synthetic tree to the court.) The tree is not evil, simply biochemically toxic to biological systems from their fossil fuel or ancient dead rooted origins. The petroleum resources to feed that tree are colossal and the rest of the world are paying dearly for it as well.)

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